Friday, June 17, 2022

COVID-19 Impact Scale

 


Scale name: COVID-19 Impact Scale

Scale overview: The COVID-19 Impact Scale is a 10-item self-report rating scale of the potential impact of COVID-19 in 3 areas of functioning: Economic, Psychological, Social.

Authors: Srinivasan & Sulur Nachimuthu

Response Type: Items are rated on a scale of agreement.

Scale item examples for 3 Subscales

Economic Factor, 4 items

 I have lost job-related income due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Psychological Factor, 4 items

Uncertainties surrounding Coronavirus (COVID-19) causes me enormous anxiety.

Social Factor, 2 items

After the Coronavirus pandemic, I actively avoid people I see sneezing and coughing.

 

Reliability: Cronbach’s alpha was 0.877 in the authors’ study.

Validity: Experts were consulted for content validity. Relationships with other scales were included in the article.

Availability:

See the PsycTESTS reference below.

Permission

Test content may be reproduced and used for non-commercial research and educational purposes without seeking written permission. Distribution must be controlled, meaning only to the participants engaged in the research or enrolled in the educational activity. Any other type of reproduction or 
distribution of test content is not authorized without written permission from the author and publisher. Always include a credit line that contains the source citation and copyright owner when writing about or using any test. (PsycTESTS)

 Cite this page

Sutton, G. W. (2022, June 17). COVID-19 Impact Scale. Assessment, Statistics, and Research. Retrieved from https://statistics.suttong.com/2022/06/covid-19-impact-scale.html

References for the scale

Srinivasan, T., & Sulur Nachimuthu, G. (2022). COVID-19 Impact Scale. PsycTESTS. https://doi.org/10.1037/t80142-000  [This reference contains the scale items.]

Srinivasan, Thilagavathy, & Sulur Nachimuthu, Geetha. (2022). COVID-19 impact on employee flourishing: Parental stress as mediator. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy,14(2), 281-290. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/tra0001037 [This reference reports the study results that used the scale and the psychometric data reported above.]

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Buy Creating Surveys on

GOOGLE BOOKS

 

AMAZON


 

 




 

Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Buy Applied Statistics for Counselors

 GOOGLE BOOKS

 AMAZON

  


 

 








Resource Link to more tests and measures:  A – Z Test Index

 

 Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 

Monday, June 13, 2022

Christian Nationalism Scale

 


Scale name: Christian Nationalism Scale

Scale overview: The Christian Nationalism Scale consists of six-items commonly used to examine beliefs about the US government and Christianity.

 Response Type: Items are rated on a scale of agreement

1 = strongly agree

2 = agree

3 = disagree

4 = strongly disagree

5 = undecided.

Scale items

The federal government should declare the United States as a Christian nation.

The federal government should advocate Christian values.

The federal government should enforce strict separation of church and state. (reverse coded)

The federal government should allow the display of religious symbols in public spaces.

The success of the United States is part of God's plan.

The federal government should allow prayer in public schools.

 

Reliability: In a 2018 article, Whitehead et al. reported Cronbach’s alpha of 0.86 for the six items.

Validity: See the Factor Analysis reported by Whitehead et al. (2018) and a different analysis by Davis (2022). Several studies report predictive validity—see for example Davis (2022).

 

Availability: The items can be found in various sources. Such as Davis (2022). Davis traced the history of the items to Baylor Religion Survey (BRS), Wave II (2007). However, see the items on the 2005 BRS survey

 

Reference for the scale

Davis, N. T. (2022). The psychometric properties of the Christian nationalism scale. Politics and Religion.(unpublished draft version date 05/11/2022). Retrieved from https://psyarxiv.com/sntv7/download/?format=pdf

Whitehead, Andrew L., Perry, Samuel L. and Baker, Joseph O. 2018. “Make America Christian again: Christian nationalism and voting for Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election.” Sociology of Religion, 79(2), pp.147-171.

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Buy Creating Surveys on

GOOGLE BOOKS

 

AMAZON

 


Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Buy Applied Statistics for Counselors

 

GOOGLE BOOKS

 

AMAZON

 


 Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, June 11, 2022

Creative Charts for Your Data

 


This stunning chart is worth a look by all those who present data at conferences or in classes. 

The source of this chart and four more useful charts is an article on inflation by Flowers and Siegel of the Washington Post 10 June 2022.

I recommend a look at the other charts as well.

An additional comment. Charts about economic issues like the cost of food and energy are also about human behavior. People raise prices and people pay more for what they need or want. Too often we separate the cost of things from what people are doing.


I write about presenting data using charts in Creating Surveys.

Buy Creating Surveys on

GOOGLE BOOKS

 

AMAZON









Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read my published articles:

 

ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

 

Wednesday, June 8, 2022

Spiritual Modeling Self-Efficacy (SMSE)

 


Scale name: Spiritual Modeling Self-Efficacy (SMSE)

Scale overview: The Spiritual Modeling Self-Efficacy scale is a 10-item self-report measure of a person’s ability to learn from spiritual models.

The scale is based on Bandura’s social learning theory. People learn best from models when they perceive they have the capacity to do what the model does (self-efficacy).

 Read more about self-efficacy.

Authors: Doug Oman et al. (See reference article below.)

Response Type: Respondents were instructed to rate each item on a scale from 0 (cannot do at all) to 100 (certain can do) representing the degree of certainty that they could perform the action described in each item.

Sample items

1. Identify persons in my family or community who, at least in some

respects, offer good spiritual examples for me

3. Be aware almost daily of the spiritual actions and attitudes of people in my

family and community who are good spiritual examples

 

Subscales = 2

SMSE-C five items refer to community models

SMSE-P five items refer to prominent models

 

Reliability: 7-week test-retest reliability was .83 in Oman et al. (2009).

Validity: The authors report evidence of construct, divergent, and convergent validity in the article.

 

Availability: The items can be found in Table 1 on page 283 of the article.

Permissions -- if identified

Contact author:  Doug Oman, School of Public Health, 50 University Hall #7360, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94971-7360.

E-mail: dougoman@post.harvard.edu

Reference for the scale

 Oman, D., Thoresen, C. E., Park, C. L., Shaver, P. R., Hood, R. W., & Plante, T. G. (2012). Spiritual modeling self-efficacy. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 4(4), 278–297. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0027941

Additional related reference

Oman, D., Thoresen, C. E., Park, C. L., Shaver, P. R., Hood, R. W., & Plante, T. G.  2009). How does one become spiritual? The Spiritual Modeling Inventory of Life Environments (SMILE). Mental Health, Religion & Culture, 12, 427–456. doi: 10.1080/13674670902758257

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Buy Creating Surveys on

GOOGLE BOOKS

 

AMAZON

 


 

 

 




Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Buy Applied Statistics for Counselors

 

GOOGLE BOOKS

 

AMAZON

 

 


 






 




Test Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

More Self-Efficacy Scales

Academic Self-Efficacy Scale >>    ASE

Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Anxiety Scale >>     MSEAQ

Self-Efficacy Scale (General) >>    SES

Reading Self-Efficacy scales >>    RSES





 

 

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read my published articles:

 

ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

 

 

 

 


Tuesday, June 7, 2022

Reading Self-Efficacy Scales

 


Scale name:  Reading Self-Efficacy Scales

 

Scale overview: The Reading Self-Efficacy Scales (RSES) measure eight beliefs of students’ capacity to read in a culturally familiar context.

Authors: Heather M. Kelley et al.

Response Type: Students used an 11-point numbered scale (0 to 10) to rate their beliefs about reading. Each of five phrases are linked to more than one number. The five phrases are: Not sure, A Little Sure, Kind of Sure, Sure, Really Sure.

Sample items

When you read in your English Language Arts class, how sure are you that you could successfully …

Identify the main idea of a story.

Identify the place where a story happened.

Scale note: The wording of the scales was similar but modified depending on one of three tasks: General reading (GR), Culturally familiar (CF), Culturally unfamiliar (CU).

Reliability: Internally consistency was measured with Cronbach’s alpha for each scale: GR = .85, CF = .90, CU = .70 (rounded).

Validity: The scale items were developed based on state objectives and benchmarks.

Availability: The full set of items are available in the PsycTESTS reference and in the appendixes to the research article.

Permissions:

The corresponding author is Heather Kelley hkelley@valdosta.edu

The publisher is Routledge Taylor & Francis Group

  Read more about self-efficacy.


Reference for the scales

Kelley, H. M., Siwatu, K. O., Tost, J. R., & Martinez, J. (2015). Reading Self-Efficacy Scales. PsycTESTS. https://doi.org/10.1037/t48033-000

Kelley, H. M., Siwatu, K. O., Tost, J. R., & Martinez, J. (2015). Culturally familiar tasks on reading performance and self-efficacy of culturally and linguistically diverse students. Educational Psychology in Practice, 31(3), 293–313. https://doi.org/10.1080/02667363.2015.1033616

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Buy Creating Surveys on

GOOGLE BOOKS

 

AMAZON


  

 





Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Buy Applied Statistics for Counselors

 

GOOGLE BOOKS

 

AMAZON

 

 










  

Test Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

Related Self-Efficacy Scales

Academic Self-Efficacy Scale >> ASE

 Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Anxiety Scale >>  MSEAQ

 Self-Efficacy Scale (General) >> SES


Links to Connections

Please checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books


  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 


FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read/download published articles:

 

  

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

 

 

Monday, June 6, 2022

The Diet Self-Efficacy Scale (DIET-SE)

 


Scale name: The Diet Self Efficacy Scale (DIET-SE)

Scale overview: The Diet Self-Efficacy Scale (DIET-SE) is an 11-item self-report measure. Respondents rate their degree of confidence in managing eating situations.

Authors: Stich et al. (see reference below)

Response Type: A 5-point Likert Type rating of confidence

0 = Not at all

1 = A little confident

2 = Moderately confident

3 = Quite confident

4 = Very confident

Sample items

1. You are having dinner with your family and your favorite meal has been prepared. You finish the first helping and someone says, "Why don't you have some more?" How confident are you that you would turn down a second helping?

5. You are invited to someone's house for dinner and your host is an excellent cook. You often overeat because the food tastes so good. How confident are you that you  would not overeat as a dinner guest?

Subscales = 3

HCF = HIGH CALORIC FOOD TEMPTATIONS

SIF = SOCIAL AND INTERNAL FACTORS

NEE = NEGATIVE EMOTIONAL EVENTS

Reliability:

Test-retest correlations for a 2- to 3-week interval were rtt = .83 for the full scale. Subscale results were: HCF .75, SIF .77, NEE .80

Internal consistency values  ranged from alpha  = .82 to .87 for the full measure and for the subscales, alpha values were HCF .70-.77; SIF  .71-79; NEE .75-.79.

See the Stich et al. (2009) reference for details.

Validity:

Construct validity was evaluated by factor analysis, which supported the three subscales. See the article for evidence of convergent and criterion-related validity.

Availability:

The article can be found in various databases. See Table 1 for the items.

Permissions -- if identified

  Read more about self-efficacy.


Reference for the scale

Stich, C., Knäuper, B., & Tint, A. (2009). A scenario-based measure of dieting self-efficacy: The DIET-SE. Assessment, 16, 16-30. See ResearchGate

Reference for using scales in research:

Buy Creating Surveys on

GOOGLE BOOKS

 

AMAZON

 


 

 

 

Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Buy Applied Statistics for Counselors

 

GOOGLE BOOKS

 

AMAZON

 







 

Test Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

 

 

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read published articles:

 

 ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

 

 

 

 

Projective Testing

  In psychological assessment using projective tests, clinicians provide patients with ambiguous words, sentences, or images and look for th...