Tuesday, June 29, 2021

Inventory of Complicated Spiritual Grief

 


Scale name:  Inventory of Complicated Spiritual Grief

Scale overview

The ICSG is an 18-item scale. Participants are asked to think about their loss and respond to items to express their beliefs about their feelings.

A second version was published as ICSG 2.0 in 2019.

Authors: Laurie A. Burke and others (2014) - see reference below

Version 2.0 See Burke et al 2019

Response Type

All items are rated on a 5-point Likert-type rating.

Subscales: The authors list items associated with two subscales:

1. Insecurity with God

2. Disruption in Religious Practice

Sample items 2014 scale

1) I don’t understand why God has made it so hard for me.

17) I sense the absence of God more than I do the presence of God.

 

Reliability and Validity

See the publications for details.

Availability

Version 1: See the Burke et al. 2014 PsycTESTS entry. The items are also in the Burke & Neimery 2016 article, Appendix

Version 2: See Burke et al. 2019

 SCOPES Domain = Self/ spirituality

Permissions -- if identified

Contact the publisher- Taylor and Francis

References

Burke, L. A., Crunk, A.E., Neimeyer, R. A. Bai, H. (2019):

Inventory of Complicated Spiritual Grief 2.0 (ICSG 2.0): Validation of a revised measure of spiritual distress in bereavement, Death Studies, DOI: 10.1080/07481187.2019.1627031

Burke, L. A., Neimeyer, R. A., Holland, J. M., Dennard, S., Oliver, L., & Shear, M. K. (2014). Inventory of Complicated Spiritual Grief. PsycTESTS. https://doi.org/10.1037/t46064-000

Burke, Laurie A., Neimeyer, Robert A., Holland, Jason M., Dennard, Sharon, Oliver, Linda, & Shear, M. Katherine. (2014). Inventory of complicated spiritual grief: Development and validation of a new measure. Death Studies, 38(4), 239-250. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07481187.2013.810098, © 2014 by Taylor & Francis

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 

 


Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 



Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

 Links to Connections

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Belief in God Measure

 


Scale name: Belief in God Measure

Scale overview

This is a five-item self-report measure.

Authors: J. B. Grubbs et al.

Response Type

All items are rated on a 5-point Likert-type rating.

Subscales

Sample items

I don’t know whether there is a God, and I don’t believe that there is any way to find out.

Psychometric

The measure was used to screen for people who believed in God in a study about anger toward God.

Availability The items can be found in the references below.

Permissions -- if identified

May be used in noncommercial research and for educational purposes.

SCOPES domain = Self/spirituality

Reference

Grubbs, J. B., Exline, J. J., & Campbell, W. K. (2013). Belief in God Measure. PsycTESTS. https://doi.org/10.1037/t28363-000

 

Grubbs, Joshua B., Exline, Julie J., & Campbell, W. Keith. (2013). I deserve better and god knows it! Psychological entitlement as a robust predictor of anger at God. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 5(3), 192-200. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0032119

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 

 


Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 


Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

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Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, June 22, 2021

Duke University Religion Index (DUREL)

Scale name: Duke University Religion Index (DUREL)

Scale overview

The Duke University Religion Index (DUREL) is a 5-item measure of religious participation. The Index measures three dimensions of religiosity:

1. Organizational Religious Activity (ORA)

2. Nonorganizational Religious Activity (NORA)

3. Intrinsic Religiosity (IR; also called subjective religiosity)

Authors:

Koenig et al. (1997).

Response Type

It is a self-report scale. Two questions ask about frequency of activity on a 1 to 6 scale. The two items vary slightly in wording.

Three items reflect religious experience and are rated on a 5-point scale from 1 = Definitely not true to 5 = Definitely true of me

Subscales = 3- see names above

Sample items

1. How often do you attend church or other religious meetings?

2. How often do you spend time in private religious activities, such as prayer, meditation, or Bible study?

3. In my life, I experience the presence of the Divine (i.e., God)

Reliability

According to Koenig and Büssing (2010), test-retest reliability was .91 and alphas ranged from .78 to .91.

Validity

Koenig and Büssing (2010) reported convergent validity values of r = .71 to .86 with other measures of religiosity. The DUREL has been used in more than 100 studies around the world.

Availability:

MDPI link

           Download from AAMC link       

Also see the University of Miami Link

           A bilingual English-Spanish version is available at U Miami

The DUREL has been translated into many languages.

Permissions -- if identified

See the open access article- reference below.

References

Koenig, H.G.; Büssing, A. (2010). The Duke University Religion Index (DUREL): A five-item measure for use in epidemological studies. Religions1, 78-85. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel1010078

Koenig, H.G.; Meador, K.G.; Parkerson, G. (1997). Religion index for psychiatric research. American Journal Psychiatry., 154, 885-886.

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 

 

 

 



Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 Resource Link for more tests and measures:  A – Z Test Index

 Links to Connections


Please Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

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FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

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Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 


Tuesday, June 1, 2021

Statistics of Mass Shooting in the USA

 FBI Reports Data

Active Shooters 2019 FBI Report


Several aspects of the FBI reports can help students, faculty, and leaders in presenting important data to the public.

1. On page 3 they define what they mean by an "active shooter." And they clarify that the report does not include all gun-related shootings.

2. Page 4 uses a two-color strategy to compare two years (2019, 2018) side by side. The selection of numbers to compare seems reasonable to understand what is going on.


3. Page 5 tells us where the shootings take place using a color-coded map. It offers a clear look though the selection of green may not be the best color when the gray areas are the "safe zones" where no shootings took place. See photo at the top of this page.

4. The graphics on page 7 offer a helpful illustration of ways to present information to the general public. We see data, graphic comparisons, and clear colors that help differences stand out.



Reference link to FBI 2019 Report

Permission to share- see text

Understanding problems of crime involves accurate statistics presented in a way that voters and law makers can understand the facts when deciding what to do about public safety.

I write about research methods and statistics and present this information to help others present data that can help decision-makers.

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on   AMAZON or   GOOGLE


Learn More in Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE



Please check out my website   www.suttong.com

   and see my books on   AMAZON       or  GOOGLE STORE

Also, consider connecting with me on    FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton    

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton    

You can read many published articles at no charge:

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton     ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 








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