Showing posts with label Self-efficacy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Self-efficacy. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 17, 2020

Personal Self-Concept Questionnaire (PSQ)

 

The Personal Self-Concept Questionnaire (PSQ) measures self-concept based on responses to 18 items, which are grouped into four categories: 

1. Self-fulfilment

2. Autonomy

3. Honesty

4. Emotional self-concept

[Read more about Self-Concept and Self-Identity]

The PSQ is a Likert-type scale with five response options ranging from totally disagree to totally agree.

Reliability and Validity

In the first study, coefficient alpha = .85 and in study two, alpha = .83.

Data analysis supported a four-dimensional model (see the four categories above). Positive correlations with other self-concept measures were statistically significant.

Other notes

The authors estimated it took about 10 minutes to complete the PSQ.

Their first study included people ages 12 to 36 (n = 506). In the second study, ages were 15 to 65 (= 1135).

Availability

The PSQ items can be found in the Goñi et al. (2011) article (see the reference below). The 18-items can be found in Table 1 on page 512. Notice the 4-items eliminated from the 22 item measure used in the first study.

Self-Concept is the focal dimension of S in the SCOPES model of functioning.

Resource Link for more tests and questionnairesA – Z Test Index


Related concepts




Read more about Self and Self-Concepts in Psychology

Reference

Goñi, E., Madariaga, J. M., Axpe, I., & Goñi, A. (2011). Structure of the Personal Self-Concept (PSC) Questionnaire. International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology, 11, 509-522.

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Monday, November 16, 2020

Academic Self-Efficacy Scale for Students

 

High School Students/ Bing images Free to use

The ASESS (Academic Self-Efficacy for Students) is designed to measure students’ opinions about their ability to perform well on academic tasks. High scoring students earn better grades and are more persistent compared to low scoring students. Those with high scores also use more effective cognitive strategies, organize their time more efficiently, and are better at self-regulation.

[Read more about self-efficacy theory.]

Format

The 11-items are rated on a 1 to 5 basis from “No Confidence at all” to “Complete Confidence.”

Instructions

The instructions on the scale ask the students: “How much confidence do you have that you can successfully...”

Sample Items

1. Finish homework assignments by deadlines?

8. Remember information presented in class and textbooks?

Availability

When I wrote this post, the scale could be found at this link:  http://academics.ivc.edu/success/Documents/Self%20Regulation%20Assesment.pdf

The scale is reported as an adaptation from Zimmerman et al. (1992) and Chemers et al. (2001).

Cite this post

Sutton, G. W. (2020, November 16). Academic Self-efficacy Scale for Students. Retrieved from https://statistics.suttong.com/2020/11/academic-self-efficacy-scale-for.html 

Another scale: Academic Self-Efficacy Scale ASE


Resource LinkA – Z Test Index

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References

Chemers, M., Hu, L., & Garcia, B. (2001). Academic self-efficacy and first-year college student performance and adjustment. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93(1), 55-64.

Zimmerman, B.J., Bandura, A., & Martinez-Pons, M. (1992). Self-motivation for academic attainment: The role of self-efficacy beliefs and personal goal-setting. American Educational Research Journal, 29, 663-676.

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Academic Self-Efficacy Scale ASE

 

The Academic Self-Efficacy Scale is an application of Self-Efficacy Theory to examine the relationship between self-efficacy and academic performance. The work of Chemers et al. (2001) has been widely cited.

Format

The 8-items are rated on a 7-point Likert-type scale ranging from 1 = Very Untrue to 7 = Very True.

Sample Items

2. I know how to take notes.

6. I usually do very well in school and at academic tasks.

 Reliability, Validity, and Other Research notes

In the article describing the development and use of the ASE, the authors observed: “As predicted, academic self-efficacy was significantly and directly related to academic expectations and academic performance.” (Chemers et al., 2001, p. 61)

 Sutton et al. (2011) reported alpha of .83 in their study of academic self-esteem and personal strengths. ASE was highly positively correlated with ACT scores (.24) and GPA (.39).

An Arabic version of the ASE developed by Almohazie (2018) revealed Cronbach’s alphas of .935 for men and .918 for women. The average item mean was 5.38 ( SD  = 1.14).

For help on writing items and organizing surveys

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Availability of the ASE:  Contact person is Martin Chemers, Professor Emeritus, at University of California, Santa Cruz mchemers@ucsc.edu 

KEY WORDS: Academic Self-Efficacy, Academic achievement, personal strengths, self-concept, self-esteem

Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index


A related scale link: Academic Self-Efficacy for Students 

 References

Almohazie, M. F. (2018). Reliability and validity of an Arabic translation of academic self-efficacy scale (ASE) on students at King Faisal University. Available from Wayne State University Dissertations. 1910. https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/1910

Chemers, M. M., Hu, L., & Garcia, B. F. (2001). Academic self-efficacy and first-year college student performance and adjustment. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93, 55-64.

Sutton, G. W., Phillips, S., Lehnert, A. B., Bartle, B. W., & Yokomizo, P. (2011). Strengths, academic self-efficacy, admission test scores, and GPA in a Christian university sample. Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 30, 28-36.  Academia Link    Research Gate Link

CLICK FOR FREE DOWNLOAD of Sutton et al. article using the Academic Self-Efficacy Scale

 Read More about Self-Efficacy and its relationship to Self-Concept

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Thursday, November 12, 2020

New General Self-Efficacy Scale

 

Bing Images/free to share and use

General Self-Efficacy refers to a trait in contrast to more specific dimensions of self-efficacy. The New General Self-Efficacy Scale (NGSES) was developed by Chen et al. (2001). The scale consists of 8-items.

The assessment of Self-Efficacy may be relevant in psychotherapy, career planning, and organizational psychology. Read more about Self-Efficacy Theory.

 

Instructions

Using a 5-point rating scale (1= strongly disagree; 3 = neither agree nor disagree; 5 = strongly agree), respondents show how much they agree with eight statements, such as “Even when things are tough, I can perform quite well.” Researchers then calculate a score for each respondent by taking the average of their ratings.

Sample items

  1. I will be able to achieve most of the goals that I set for myself.
  2. When facing difficult tasks, I am certain that I will accomplish them.

Reliability

The authors reported alpha = .86 and .90 (two times) in study 2 (See Chen et al., 2012).

Validity

The authors reported correlations with several measures in Table 1 (p. 72). The SGSE was positively correlated with the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (r = .75)

Where to find the scale online

https://sparqtools.org/mobility-measure/new-general-self-efficacy-scale/#all-survey-questions

Learn more about assessment in counseling  in Applied Statistics: Concepts for Counselors






Develop surveys to measure Self-Efficacy and other traits using Creating Surveys






Read More about Self-Efficacy and its relationship to Self-Concept

Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index


Reference

Chen, G., Gully, S. M., & Eden, D. (2001). Validation of a new general self-efficacy scale. Organizational Research Methods4(1), 62-83.

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