Thursday, January 21, 2021

Organizational Trust Index (OTI)

 

Scale name:           Organizational Trust Index (OTI)

 Scale overview

The OTI evaluates trust in an organization with items that reflect five dimensions of trust. 

Of note, trust is a key component of working relationships and efforts to encourage reconciliation following a rift.

Author(s) See the “about” tab at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs (UCCS) Website for the OTI.

Items:  In 2021 there were 29 items on the scale.

Response Type

The OTI is a 5-point rating scale. Each item can be rated from “very little” to “very great.”

Subscales:

     The OTI refers to 5 dimensions:

Competence

Openness and Honesty

Concern for Employees

Reliability

Identification

Sample item

My immediate supervisor listens to me.

Reliability

The manual reports alpha of .95 for the 29-items and a range of .85 to .90 for the five subscales.

Validity

Search for studies using the OTI.

Availability

See the information on the university website. The scale may be taken online. https://uccs.edu/trustresearch/organizational-trust-survey

A 50-page manual with test items and information is available from IABC (International Association of Business Communications).

 Permissions -- if identified

Not specified on the UCCS website.

Reference(s)

Nwankpa, Joseph K. and Roumani, Yaman (2014) "The Influence of Organizational Trust and Organizational Mindfulness on ERP Systems Usage," Communications of the Association for Information Systems: 34, Article 85. DOI: 10.17705/1CAIS.03485

 Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 

 

 Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 

 

 



Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

Links to Connections

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Leadership Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ)

 

Scale name: Leadership Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ)


Scale overview

The LBDQ allows members of a group to describe the behavior of a leader. There are two dimensions of leadership behavior identified as initiating structure and consideration.

 Author(s): The Personnel Research Board. Names of researchers provided at the Ohio State University webpage for LBDQ.

Items = 20

Response Type

The LBDQ is a rating scale. Participants respond to statements using a 5-point Likert-type response ranging from 1 = never to 5 = always.

Subscales

There are two subscales: Initiating Structure (S) and Consideration (C). Each scale has 10 items.

 Sample items

Initiating Structure: “Schedules the work to be done.”

Consideration: “Is willing to make changes.”

Reliability

See the manual and publications.

Validity

See the manual and publications.

Availability

See the OSU website where the instructions appear.

“To obtain free access of the full Manual and the Form XII Self Questionnaire, complete the following survey: go.osu.edu/LBDQ.”

Permissions -- if identified

See the OSU website for a link to the manual and form.

Reference(s)

https://fisher.osu.edu/centers-partnerships/leadership/leader-behavior-description-questionnaire-lbdq

 Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 

  

Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

  

 

Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES)

 Scale overview

The RSES is a 10-item measure of general self-esteem. It is widely used in research and clinical practice.

Author(s) Morris Rosenberg

Items = 10

Response Type

Participants respond using a 4-point Likert type scale  ranging from strongly agree, agree, disagree, to strongly disagree.

Subscales: None.

Items provided by Fetzer Institute online

Instructions

Below is a list of statements dealing with your general feelings about yourself. Please

indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with each statement.

1. On the whole, I am satisfied with myself.

2. At times I think I am no good at all.

3. I feel that I have a number of good qualities.

4. I am able to do things as well as most other people.

5. I feel I do not have much to be proud of.

6. I certainly feel useless at times.

7. I feel that I'm a person of worth, at least on an equal plane with others.

8. I wish I could have more respect for myself.

9. All in all, I am inclined to feel that I am a failure.

10. I take a positive attitude toward myself.

Scoring:

Items 2, 5, 6, 8, 9 are reverse scored. Give “Strongly Disagree” 1 point, “Disagree” 2 points,

“Agree” 3 points, and “Strongly Agree” 4 points. Sum scores for all ten items. Keep scores

on a continuous scale. Higher scores indicate higher self-esteem.

Reliability

The scale has performed well in numerous previous studies.

“RSES has test-retest correlations ranging from .82 to .88. Cronbach’s alpha from various samples has a range of .77 to .88. There is a unidimensional and two-factor structure to the scale (University of Maryland, 2019). Cronbach’s Alpha gives us an indication of internal consistency (Tavakol & Dennick, 2011). Generally, a number greater than .70 is acceptable (UCLA, n.d.).” (Information from Miller, K., 2020)

Validity

The scale is widely used in published research. See recent articles for actual data.

Availability

The items above were obtained from the Fetzer Institute’s website.

Permissions -- if identified

None identified by the Fetzer Institute in the pdf.

 Reference(s)

Rosenberg, Morris. 1965. Society and the Adolescent Self-Image. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

 Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 

 

Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 


Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 

Organizational Trust Index (OTI)

  Scale name:            Organizational Trust Index (OTI)   Scale overview The OTI evaluates trust in an organization with items that re...