Showing posts with label relationship survey. Show all posts
Showing posts with label relationship survey. Show all posts

Monday, June 20, 2022

Parent-Child Relationship Scale CPRS Review

 


Scale name: Parent-Child Relationship Scale CPRS

Scale overview: The Parent-Child Relationship Scale (CPRS) is a 15-item parent self-report rating of relational conflict and closeness.

Response Type: Items are rated on a scale of applicability from 1 to 5. Instructions and number terms are as follows.

Each items uses the same five point scale.

Please assign the following values to each response:

1 = definitely does not apply

2 = not really

3 = neutral, not sure

4 = applies somewhat

5 = definitively applies

Subscales = 2

    Conflict 8-items: 2, 4, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

    Closeness 7- items: 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 15

Sample Scale items

I share an affectionate, warm relationship with my child.

My child and I always seem to be struggling with each other.

Scale statistics

See Table 2 of the article below for means and standard deviations for mothers and fathers relationship ratings with boys and girls on each subscale at both time periods of age 54 months and first grade.

Reliability:

Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Separate values were reported for mothers and fathers at two times: 54 months and first grade.

Conflict subscale: Maternal: @54 m and first grade = .84. Paternal: @54m = .90, @ Grade 1 = .78

Closeness subscale: Maternal @54m = .69, @ Grade 1 = .64. Paternal @54m = .72, @ Grade 1 = .74

The relationship between the subscales was low, r = .16.

 

Validity:

See the article for details. The authors obtained ratings of observed interactions. Also, there are correlations between subscale scores and the Child Behavior Checklist and the Social Skills Rating System.

 

Availability:

Primary contact: Kate Driscoll PhD Katherine.driscoll@childrensharvard.edu

The scale https://www.frpn.org/asset/measures-father-child-relationship-quality

The article about the scale:  https://education.virginia.edu/sites/default/files/uploads/resourceLibrary/Mothers_and_Fathers_Perceptions_%28Driscoll_Pianta%29.pdf

Cite this post

Sutton, G. W. (2022, June 20). The Parent-Child Relationship Scale (CPRS) review. Assessment, Statistics, and Research. Retrieved from

Reference article for the scale

Driscoll, K., & Pianta, R. C.  (2011). Mothers' and fathers' perceptions of conflict and closeness in parent-child relationships during early childhood.  Journal of Early Childhood and Infant Psychology, 7, 1-24.

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 

 




Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 





Test Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

  

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

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Saturday, June 18, 2022

Father-Daughter Relationship Scale

 


Scale name: Father Daughter Relationship Scale

Scale overview: The Father-Daughter Relationship Scale is a 9-item scale of perceived closeness, which was studied in a sample of young women.

Authors: Jennie Brown, Laura Thompson, David Trafimow

Response Type: All items are rated on a scale of 4 to 7 values depending on the questions about time or closeness.

Subscales = 2

Closeness = 4 items

Time together = 5 items

Sample: One sample of mostly Euro-American or Hispanic American women between age 17 and 25.

Reliability: Cronbach’s alpha = .89

Validity: Factor analysis reported.

 

Availability: See Appendix A, p. 214.

 

Reference for the scale

Brown, J., Thompson, L. A., & Trafimow, D. (2002). The father-daughter relationship rating scale. Psychological Reports90(1), 212–214. https://doi.org/10.2466/PR0.90.1.212-214

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 

Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 

 


 

Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

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Wednesday, December 9, 2020

How to Measure Closeness in Relationships- Line Scale of Closeness

 


Line Scale of Closeness (LSC)

The Line Scale of Closeness (LSC) is a simple measure that can be used in clinical or research settings. In a clinical setting, psychotherapists and clients can explore any barriers to closeness and discuss how the level of closeness has changed over time. The LSC may also be used to identify progress toward counseling goals.

To compare changes over time or differences between groups, use a standardized line length such as 7-inches or 18-cm. 

On each end of the line, identify the client or participant and on the opposite end of the line, identify the person who is the subject of feeling close to or distant from. Ask the client or participant to place an X on the line to indicate how close they feel toward the other person.

Example


 Example

       ______________________________________________________________

Self

Other

 

Scoring

Place a ruler on the scale and record the score in centimeters to two decimal points e.g., 12.25 cm.

I have used this scale informally and in lab research but I have not published any results.

I have not used the scale in an online format but I think it would be easy with survey software that allows for placing a response along a continuum.

Language

I have worked in a variety of settings. The scale is easy to use with people of different languages or limited vocabulary.

 

Religion

For clients who express feeling distant from God, the Line Scale of Closeness (LSC) is an easy way for them to identify their perception of closeness. 

Although I have not used the word attachment, I hypothesize that the score on the LSC would be significantly correlated with avoidant and anxious attachment measured on Likert-scales.

I have used the scale to measure closeness to God in Christian samples. In experimental procedures, three groups receive similar instructions varied by the person of the Trinity. Most students felt closer to Jesus but the response to God the Father or the Holy Spirit were not consistent. These data suggest that attachment to God inventories may be less accurate than identifying Jesus as the focus of attachment for evangelical Christians. These are only hypotheses because the scale has not been used with a large sample and subject to peer review.

Permission

You have permission to use this scale for noncommercial use only (e.g., teaching and research). Kindly cite this post in your reports and presentations.

 Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

How to cite this post (APA Style)

Sutton, G.W. (2020, December 9). How to Measure Closeness in Relationships: Line Scale of Closeness (LSC)Assessment, Statistics, & Research https://statistics.suttong.com/2020/12/how-to-measure-closeness-in.html 

Please consider adding my books as texts or handbooks in clinical and research settings. They are in use by professors teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in Psychology, Counselling, Education, and Seminary settings. 

Applied Statistics for Counselors on AMAZON

 

Creating Surveys on AMAZON    or   GOOGLE  Worldwide

 


 

 


Links to Connections

Checkout My Page    www.suttong.com

  

My Books  AMAZON          and             GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

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Articles: Academia   Geoff W Sutton   ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

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 Related Measures

Adult Attachment Scale

Attachment to God Inventory




 

 

 

Tuesday, November 3, 2020

Experiences in Close Relationships-Relational Structures

 

Experiences in Close Relationships-Relational Structures

 

The ECR-RS is a measure of adult attachment that includes four 9-item subscales for mother, father, romantic partner, and best friend attachment (Fraley et al., 2011a). Statements on the ECR-RS are rated on a 7-point scale (1 = strongly disagree; 7 = strongly agree).

 

Sample items from the ECR-RS

 

I find it easy to depend on this person.

I often worry that this person doesn't really care for me.

 

Reliability values

 

“In our research, the ECR-RS has proven to be quite useful. The test-retest reliability (over 30 days) of the individual scales are approximately .65 for the domain of romantic relationships (including individuals who experienced breakups during the 30-day period) and .80 in the parental domain.” (Chris-Fraley, n.d.)

 

Scale alpha values exceed .90 for each scale, according to Chris-Fraley.

 

Finding the ECR-RS Questionnaire,

Chris-Fraley has a copy of the scale with references and scoring information at the Illinois lab site. http://labs.psychology.illinois.edu/~rcfraley/measures/relstructures.htm

See also the 2011a reference below.

 

Additional Data

 

Chris-Fraley has provided additional references and an Excel sheet for scoring at this link: http://labs.psychology.illinois.edu/~rcfraley/measures/ecrr.htm

 

Learn more about writing items and creating surveys in

Creating Surveys on AMAZON    or   GOOGLE  Worldwide










Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index


References

 

Fraley, R. C., Heffernan, M. E., Vicary, A. M., & Brumbaugh, C. C. (2011a). Experiences in Close Relationships—Relationship Structures Questionnaire [Database record]. Retrieved from PsycTESTS. https://doi.org/10.1037/t08412-000

Fraley, R. C., Heffernan, M. E., Vicary, A. M., & Brumbaugh, C. C. (2011b). The Experiences in Close Relationships—Relationship Structures Questionnaire: A method for assessing attachment orientations across relationships. Psychological Assessment, 23, 615-625. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0022898





Friday, November 17, 2017

Marriage & Divorce Rates by Age and Year




Two charts illustrate how the divorce rate and the remarriage rate in the United States vary across seven age groups. See the captions in the charts for the sources of these data.


The rate of divorce is much higher for younger persons than for older persons but the rate of divorce has declined among younger persons than for older persons for the two-year comparison—1990 and 2015.


Remarriage rates are also much higher for younger persons but there is a significant drop since 1990 for younger persons compared to the relatively stable rate for older persons.







What is not obvious in these data are changes in people living together.


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Parent-Child Relationship Scale CPRS Review

  Scale name: Parent-Child Relationship Scale CPRS Scale overview: The Parent-Child Relationship Scale (CPRS) is a 15-item parent self-re...