Showing posts with label Religious Spiritual Beliefs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Religious Spiritual Beliefs. Show all posts

Thursday, May 19, 2022

Assessment of Spirituality and Religious Sentiments (ASPIRES) scale- Short Form

 


Scale name: Assessment of Spirituality and Religious Sentiments (ASPIRES) scale- Short Form

Scale overview: The Assessment of Spirituality and Religious Sentiments scale- Short Form (ASPIRES-SF) is a 13-item scale that measures both religious involvement and spiritual transcendence. Spiritual transcendence refers to the way people create a sense of meaning and purpose for their lives.

Authors: Ralph L. Piedmont et al. (see below)

Response Type: The ASPIRES-SF is a self-report assessment with different ratings for the two subscales—see below.

Subscales = 2

1.  Religiosity Index

  4-religious activity (e.g., prayer, reading religious literature) items are rated 1-7 to indicate frequency.

2.  Spiritual Transcendence Scale

  9-items are rated on a 1-5 scale of agreement. The items refer to a sense of meaning. These 9-items reflect 3 facets: Prayer fulfillment, Universality, and Connectedness.

Reliability: In the 2008 reference (see below) alpha values were .72 for the total transcendence scale and .79 for the Religiosity Index.

Validity: Several studies have reported on the results of the factor structure of the longer form of ASPIRES. The 2008 study included the results of a Principal Components Analysis showing 3 factors for the Spiritual Transcendence Scale and one factor for Religiosity

 

Availability: Author contract:   rpiedmont@loyola.edu

Permissions -- if identified

 

Reference for the scale

Piedmont, R. L., Kennedy, M. C., Sherman, M. F., Sherman, N. C., & Williams, J. E. G. (2008). "A Psychometric Evaluation Of The Assessment Of Spirituality And Religious Sentiments (Aspires) Scale: Short Form". In Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 19. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill. doi: https://doi.org/10.1163/ej.9789004166462.i-299.55

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

  


 





 

Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 





Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

Understanding the Psychological Soul of Spirituality

   by Ralph Piedmont and Teresa Wilkins









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Saturday, April 2, 2022

Measure of Atheist Discrimination Experiences

 


Scale name: Measure of Atheist Discrimination Experiences

Scale overview:

The 24-item Measure of Atheist Discrimination Experiences (MADE) was designed to evaluate the stress experiences of people who identify as atheists using a 6-point rating scale.

Authors: Brewster, M. E., Hammer, J., Sawyer, J. S., Eklund, A., & Palamar, J.

Response Type:  6-point Likert-type; 1 = never, 6 = almost all of the time

Subscales: There are five factors

Immoral

Bringing Shame

Asked to Pass

Overt Maltreatment

Social Ostracism

 

Sample items

Immoral - I have been told that, as an atheist, I cannot be a moral person.

 

Bringing Shame - I have been told that I am selfish because I am atheist.

 

Asked to Pass - I have been asked to go along with religious traditions to avoid “stirring up trouble.”

 

Overt Maltreatment - People have denied me services because of my atheism.

 

Social Ostracism - Because of my atheism, others have avoided me.

 

 

Reliability: The 2016 article includes Cronbach’s alphas of .94 and .95

Validity: The 2016 article contains findings of a factor analysis and convergent validity.

Availability:

See the PsycTESTS reference below for a copy of the scale.

See also the article available in the journal reference and on ResearchGate

Permissions -- if identified

Contact the correspondence author: Melanie E. Brewster melanie.brewster@tc.columbia.edu

 

References:

Brewster, M. E., Hammer, J., Sawyer, J. S., Eklund, A., & Palamar, J. (2016). Measure of Atheist Discrimination Experiences [Database record]. Retrieved from PsycTESTS. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/t58211-000

Brewster, Melanie E., Hammer, Joseph, Sawyer, Jacob S., Eklund, Austin, & Palamar, Joseph. (2016). Perceived experiences of atheist discrimination: Instrument development and evaluation. Journal of Counseling Psychology, Vol 63(5), 557-570. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cou0000156

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 

 




Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 








Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

  

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

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Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 

Monday, January 17, 2022

Perceived Conflict between Evolution and Religion Scale (PCoRE)

 


Scale name: Perceived Conflict between Evolution and Religion (PCoRE)

Scale overview:

Authors: M. Elizabeth Barnes, K. Supriya, Yi Zheng, Julie A. Roberts, and Sara E. Brownell

Response Type: Participants rate each item on a 5-point Likert-type scale from strongly disagree to strongly agree.

 

Subscales with a sample item: There are four subscales as follows:

1. Perceived conflict between evolution and belief in God

My belief in God makes it harder to believe that all of life on Earth evolved from ancient microscopic life.

2. Perceived conflict between evolution and religious teachings

The teachings of my religion contradict that all of life on Earth evolved from ancient microscopic life.

3. Perceived conflict with evolution among religious community

My religious community does not believe that all of life on Earth evolved from ancient microscopic life.

4. Perceived conflict between evolution and religious beliefs

My personal religious beliefs make it harder to believe that humans evolved from ancient ape ancestors.

Reliability: The article includes reliability calculations.

Validity: The article contains information about process, content, concurrent, and construct validity.

Availability: The full scale is available is available in a pdf supplement https://www.lifescied.org/doi/suppl/10.1187/cbe.21-02-0024

Permissions – See this link for general permissions. https://www.lifescied.org/permissions

Author contact:  liz.barnes@mtsu.edu

 

Article Reference

Barnes, M. E., Supriya, K., Zheng, Y., Roberts, J.A., & Brownell, S.E. (2021). A New Measure of Students’ Perceived Conflict between Evolution and Religion (PCoRE) Is a Stronger Predictor of Evolution Acceptance than Understanding or Religiosity. CBE—Life Sciences Education, 20, 3. https://doi.org/10.1187/cbe.21-02-0024

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 





 

 

 

Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 








Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

  

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, July 15, 2021

Five-Factor LAMBI Scale of God Representations

 

Scale name:  Five-Factor LAMBI Scale of God Representations

Scale overview

A 25-item scale that measures how people view God. The five letters in LAMBI reflect the five dimensions based on factors identified by statistical analyses. Participants rate each one-word item based on their belief about or experience with God rather than what may be considered a correct belief.

Authors:

Johnson, Kathryn A., Okun, Morris A., Cohen, Adam B., Sharp, Carissa A., & Hook, Joshua N.

Response Type

A likert-type scale with a 7-point rating from Strongly Disagree to Strongly Agree

Subscales and sample items

The five subscales are called dimensions. Following each dimension is one of the words participants rate. See the reference to obtain the full scale.

L = Limitless e.g., infinite

A = Authoritarian e.g., strict

M = Mystical e.g., nature

B = Benevolent e.g., gracious

I = Ineffable

Also, 3 items assess views of “No God” that is, Nonexistent, imaginary, and nor real.

Reliability and Validity

The researchers reported results of factor analysis in their article cited below. They reported means, standard deviations, and strong alpha levels for the subscales (e.g., see Study 5 on page 346).

Availability

See the PsycTESTS reference below.

Permissions -- if identified

According to PsycTESTS:

Test content may be reproduced and used for non-commercial research and educational purposes without seeking written permission. Distribution must be controlled.

 SCOPES MODEL DOMAIN = Self/Identity/Spirituality

References

For the scale items, see:

Johnson, K. A., Okun, M. A., Cohen, A. B., Sharp, C. A., & Hook, J. N. (2018). Five-Factor LAMBI Scale of GodRepresentations [Database record]. Retrieved from PsycTESTS. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/t68037-000

 

For the scale development article, see:

Johnson, K. A., Okun, Morris A., Cohen, A. B., Sharp, C. A., & Hook, J. N. (2019). Development and validation of the five-factor LAMBI measure of God representations. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 11(4), 339-349. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/rel0000207

A reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 

 


Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 







Test Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books


  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, June 29, 2021

Inventory of Complicated Spiritual Grief

 


Scale name:  Inventory of Complicated Spiritual Grief

Scale overview

The ICSG is an 18-item scale. Participants are asked to think about their loss and respond to items to express their beliefs about their feelings.

A second version was published as ICSG 2.0 in 2019.

Authors: Laurie A. Burke and others (2014) - see reference below

Version 2.0 See Burke et al 2019

Response Type

All items are rated on a 5-point Likert-type rating.

Subscales: The authors list items associated with two subscales:

1. Insecurity with God

2. Disruption in Religious Practice

Sample items 2014 scale

1) I don’t understand why God has made it so hard for me.

17) I sense the absence of God more than I do the presence of God.

 

Reliability and Validity

See the publications for details.

Availability

Version 1: See the Burke et al. 2014 PsycTESTS entry. The items are also in the Burke & Neimery 2016 article, Appendix

Version 2: See Burke et al. 2019

 SCOPES Domain = Self/ spirituality

Permissions -- if identified

Contact the publisher- Taylor and Francis

References

Burke, L. A., Crunk, A.E., Neimeyer, R. A. Bai, H. (2019):

Inventory of Complicated Spiritual Grief 2.0 (ICSG 2.0): Validation of a revised measure of spiritual distress in bereavement, Death Studies, DOI: 10.1080/07481187.2019.1627031

Burke, L. A., Neimeyer, R. A., Holland, J. M., Dennard, S., Oliver, L., & Shear, M. K. (2014). Inventory of Complicated Spiritual Grief. PsycTESTS. https://doi.org/10.1037/t46064-000

Burke, Laurie A., Neimeyer, Robert A., Holland, Jason M., Dennard, Sharon, Oliver, Linda, & Shear, M. Katherine. (2014). Inventory of complicated spiritual grief: Development and validation of a new measure. Death Studies, 38(4), 239-250. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07481187.2013.810098, © 2014 by Taylor & Francis

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 

 


Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 



Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

 Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 

Belief in God Measure

 


Scale name: Belief in God Measure

Scale overview

This is a five-item self-report measure.

Authors: J. B. Grubbs et al.

Response Type

All items are rated on a 5-point Likert-type rating.

Subscales

Sample items

I don’t know whether there is a God, and I don’t believe that there is any way to find out.

Psychometric

The measure was used to screen for people who believed in God in a study about anger toward God.

Availability The items can be found in the references below.

Permissions -- if identified

May be used in noncommercial research and for educational purposes.

SCOPES domain = Self/spirituality

Reference

Grubbs, J. B., Exline, J. J., & Campbell, W. K. (2013). Belief in God Measure. PsycTESTS. https://doi.org/10.1037/t28363-000

 

Grubbs, Joshua B., Exline, Julie J., & Campbell, W. Keith. (2013). I deserve better and god knows it! Psychological entitlement as a robust predictor of anger at God. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 5(3), 192-200. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0032119

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 

 


Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 


Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 

Post Hoc Tests and Data Analyses

  A post hoc test is a statistical test used to determine if a pair of values are significantly different from each other after the primary ...