Showing posts with label stress in schools. Show all posts
Showing posts with label stress in schools. Show all posts

Saturday, October 1, 2022

Wilson Stress Profile for Teachers (WSPT)

 


Scale name: Wilson Stress Profile for Teachers (WSPT)

Scale overview: The Wilson Stress Profile for Teachers (WSPT) is a 36-item self-report inventory designed to assess the level of teachers elementary and secondary schools in nine areas.

 

Response Type: Items are rated on a scale of agreement from 1 = never to 5 = very often.

Subscales: The nine subscales are as listed below.

1. Student Behavior (SB)

2. Employee/ Administrator Relationships (EAR)

3. Teacher/ Teacher Relations (TTR)

4. Parent/Teacher Relationships (PTR)

5. Time Management (TM)

6. Intrapersonal Conflicts (IC)

7. Physical Symptoms of Stress (PS)

8. Psychological/ Emotional Symptoms of Stress (PES)

9. Stress Management Techniques (SM)

Scale items

There are 4 items in each subscale for a total of 36 items. Based on the 5-point scoring system, possible total scale scores range from 36 to 180.

Sample items are listed for each subscale below.

1. Student Behavior (SB).  “I have difficulty controlling my class”

2. Employee/ Administrator Relationships (EAR). “I have difficulty in my working relationship with my administrator(s)”

3. Teacher/ Teacher Relations (TTR).  “I feel my fellow teachers think I am not doing a good job”

4. Parent/Teacher Relationships (PTR).  “Parents of my students are a source of concern for me”

5. Time Management (TM).  “I have too much to do and not enough time to do it”

6. Intrapersonal Conflicts (IC).  “Teaching is stressful for me”

7. Physical Symptoms of Stress (PS).  “I feel depressed about my job”

8. Psychological/ Emotional Symptoms of Stress (PES)

9. Stress Management Techniques (SM).  “I feel powerless to solve my

difficulties”

 

Reliability:

Internal consistency values for the total scale score were .91 for a low stress group and .93 for a high stress group (Luh et al., 1991).

Rosenberg (2010) reported .83 for the total score.

Internal consistency values (Cronbach Alpha) for subscales range from .58 to .89 (Luh et al., 1991).

Rosenberg (2010) reported a range of values (Cronbach Alpha) from .55 to .84 for the subscales.

Validity:

See Luh et al., (1991) for discriminant validity findings.

Sutton and Huberty (1984) reported a significant inverse relationship between total WSPT scores and ratings of job satisfaction (r = .474).

 

Availability:

A full list of the 36 items can be found in Rosenberg (2010) and Kendell (1982). See references below.

  

Reference for using scales in research:

Buy Creating Surveys on

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AMAZON

 


 

 

Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Buy Applied Statistics for Counselors

 

GOOGLE BOOKS

 

AMAZON

 


 

 Related Measure

 Teacher Stress Inventory

Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

  

NOTICE:

The information about scales and measures is provided for clinicians and researchers based on professional publications. The links to authors, materials, and references can change. You may be able to locate details by contacting the main author of the original article or another author on the article list.

 References for the scale

Kendell, S. E. (1982) An investigation into stress factors and levels of stress as perceived by regular classroom teachers of Newfoundland and Labrador. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Luh, W., Olejnik, S., Greenwood, G., & Parkay, F. (1991). Psychometric properties of the Wilson Stress Profile for Teachers. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality, 6, 255-270.

Rosenberg, T. C. (2010). Teacher stress: An assessment of teachers' need for and receptiveness towards a stress reduction program within one rural school system.  Educational Specialist. 98. https://commons.lib.jmu.edu/edspec201019/98

Sutton, G.W., & Huberty, T.J. (1984). An evaluation of teacher stress and job satisfaction. Education, 105, 189‑192. Academia Link  Research Gate Link

Links to Connections

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Thursday, September 8, 2022

College Student Stress Scale CSSS

 


Scale name: College Student Stress Scale

Scale overview: The College Student Stress Scale is an 11-item self-report assessment of college students’ response to items about distress, feeling anxious, or questioning their ability.

 

Response Type: Items are rated on a scale of frequency of occurrence from 1 = Never  to 5 = Very Often.

Scale instructions and items

For the following items, report how often each has occurred this semester using the following scale

Never

Rarely

Sometimes

Often

Very Often

1

2

3

4

5

 

Examples (See the reference for the wording of the 11 items.)

Item 1. asks about personal relationships

Item 2. asks about family

 

Reliability: Cronbach’s alpha = .87 in a sample of 185 college students (Feldt & Koch, 2011)

Validity: Findings from a follow-up study revealed strong convergent validity with the Perceived Stress Scale (r = .80).  The authors also reported “Zero-order coefficients of correlation indicated that the CSSS total score is significantly correlated with neuroticism (large effect size) and also test anxiety and self-efficacy for learning and performance (both medium effect size)” (Feldt & Koch, 2011)

 

Availability:

The full text of the scale is available on PsycTESTS

Permissions:

Test content may be reproduced and used for non-commercial research and educational purposes without seeking written permission. Distribution must be controlled, meaning only to the participants engaged in the research or enrolled in the educational activity. Any other type of reproduction or distribution of test content is not authorized without written permission from the author and publisher. Always include a credit line that contains the source citation and copyright owner when writing about or using any test.

 

References for the scale

Feldt, R. C. (2008). College Student Stress Scale [Database record]. Retrieved from PsycTESTS. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/t07526-000

Feldt, R. C., & Koch, C. (2011). Reliability and Construct Validity of the College Student Stress Scale. Psychological Reports108(2), 660–666. https://doi.org/10.2466/02.08.13.16.PR0.108.2.660-666

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Buy Creating Surveys on

GOOGLE BOOKS

 

AMAZON

 


 

 

 




Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Buy Applied Statistics for Counselors

 

GOOGLE BOOKS

 

AMAZON

 


 

 

 




Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

 

 

NOTICE:

The information about scales and measures is provided for clinicians and researchers based on professional publications. The links to authors, materials, and references can change. You may be able to locate details by contacting the main author of the original article or another author on the article list.

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 

Monday, February 5, 2018

Teacher Stress Inventory





Educators, School Administrators, Mental Health workers, and parents ought to be aware of teacher stress because of the critical role teachers play all societies. High levels of stress may lead to burnout.


There are several measures of teacher stress, which can help you assess and monitor stress levels. One popular measure is the Teacher Stress Inventory (TSI) revised by Schutz and Long in 1988

The scale uses a 5-point Likert-type scale to rate stressful situations in seven categories (an item example in parentheses):

Role ambiguity (I am unclear on what the scope and responsibilities of my job are)

Role stress (I find that I have extra work beyond what should be normally expected of me)

Organizational management (My administrative head does not ask my opinion on decisions that directly affect me)

Job satisfaction (All in all, I would say that am I am not satisfied with my job)

Life satisfaction (My life is currently quite lonely)

Task stress (I find that dealing with student discipline problems puts a lot of stress on me)

Supervisory support (My administrative head does not pay attention to what I say)



Applied Statistics: Concepts for Counselors


Available in over 12 countries.


Reliability values range widely depending on the study. Many are in acceptable ranges. Check out the articles online relevant to your proposed sample (e.g., U.S. Elementary School Teachers). The TSI has been used in various countries and there are different translations available.


You can find many articles on the TSI online, including the full text of the original and revised (shorter) versions. The shorter, 36-item version is more recent.

Learn more about the TSI at http://www.instructionaltech.net/TSI/


Here’s a link to articles on the Teacher Stress Inventory at science.gov





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Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index


Related Measure


Wilson Stress Profile for Teachers




Connections and Links to Resources

My Page    www.suttong.com

My Books   AMAZON

FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton

TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

LinkedIN Geoffrey Sutton  PhD

Publications (many free downloads)
     
  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   (PhD)
    
  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton   (PhD)







Wilson Stress Profile for Teachers (WSPT)

  Scale name: Wilson Stress Profile for Teachers (WSPT) Scale overview: The Wilson Stress Profile for Teachers (WSPT) is a 36-item self-r...