Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Measuring Guilt and Shame with the GASP (Guilt and Shame Scale)





Taya Cohen of Carnegie Mellon University has made the Guilt and Shame Proneness Scale (GASP) available online. Here’s what Dr. Cohen said about the scale in 2011. I’ll include a link to the full scale below.

The Guilt and Shame Proneness scale (GASP) measures individual differences in the propensity to experience guilt and shame across a range of personal transgressions. The GASP contains four fouritem subscales: GuiltNegativeBehaviorEvaluation (GuiltNBE), GuiltRepair, ShameNegativeSelfEvaluation (ShameNSE), and ShameWithdraw.

Each item on the GASP is rated on a 7-point scale from 1 = very unlikely to 7 = very likely.

Here’s an example of an item from the GASP scale.

_____ 1. After realizing you have received too much change at a store, you decide to keep it because the salesclerk doesn't notice. What is the likelihood that you would feel uncomfortable about keeping the money?

Information about reliability, validity, and factor structure can be found in the 2011 reference below. The article reports the results of several studies. One interesting finding is the relationship of both shame and guilt to morality--they share some common features. People high in both guilt and shame are less likely to engage in unethical business behavior. 

Ad. Learn more about Creating Surveys -- Download a FREE sample.













There’s more to the discussion than I have stated here so, do see the entire article.

Finding the GASP scale

If the link no longer works, see the 2011 reference below.

Ad. Learn more about test statistics in counseling with Applied Statistics Read a FREE sample before you buy.


References

Cohen, T. R., Wolf, S. T., Panter, A. T., & Insko, C. A. (2011). Introducing the GASP scale: A new measure of guilt and shame proneness. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100(5), 947966. doi: 10.1037/a0022641 Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2011-08412-001

Wolf, S. T., Cohen, T. R., Panter, A. T., & Insko, C. A. (2010). Shame proneness and guilt proneness: Toward the further understanding of reactions to public and private transgressions. Self & Identity, 9, 337362. doi: 10.1080/15298860903106843

You may also be interested in a related post about Test of Self-Conscious Affect (TOSCA).


Getting permission to use the GASP
APA is the copyright owner. Here is the link regarding copyright permission:

Connections

My Page    www.suttong.com

My Books  
 AMAZON     GOOGLE PLAY STORE

FACEBOOK  
 Geoff W. Sutton

TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

LinkedIN Geoffrey Sutton  PhD



Publications (many free downloads)
     
  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   (PhD)
     
  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton   (PhD)


Measuring Shame and Self-Conscious Emotions TOSCA



Psychologists assess shame as one of a few measures of self-conscious emotions. In addition to shame, the list includes embarrassment, guilt, humiliation, and pride. As with many measures of person characteristics, there are measures of traits or dispositions and measures of states. 

State shame is a temporary emotion such as a state of shame following a specific act that has been made public. Trait shame is a durable condition, which means a person experiences shame for a period of time in multiple settings.

The classic measure of shame is the TOSCA (Test of Self-Conscious Affect. The TOSCA, developed by June P. Tangney, is now in its third edition and includes versions for adolescents (TOSCA-A) and children (TOSCA-C; Tangney & Dearing, 2002).

People taking the TOSCA read a scenario and provide a response. The responses reflect different ways to respond to a situation: shame-proneness, guilt-proneness, externalization, pride in one’s self (alpha pride), pride in one’s behavior (beta pride), and detachment.

The TOSCA scales are widely used. See the references in Watson, Gomez, and Gullone (2016) for a list of recent studies.

Ad. Learn more about test statistics in counseling with Applied Statistics Read a FREE sample before you buy.



If you would like copies of various measures, contact the psychology lab linked to Professor Tangney’s page at George Mason University. There is a list of scales and an email address. http://mason.gmu.edu/~jtangney/measures.html

Learn more about shame in this interview with June Tangney: https://www.apa.org/pubs/books/interviews/4317264-tangney

References

Tangney, J. P., & Dearing, R. L. (2002). Shame and guilt. New York: Guilford Press.

Watson, S. D., Gomez, R., & Gullone, E. (2016). The Shame and Guilt Scales of the Test of Self-Conscious Affect-Adolescent (TOSCA-A): Psychometric Properties for Responses from Children, and Measurement Invariance Across Children and Adolescents. Frontiers in psychology7, 635. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00635

You might also be interested in the Guilt and Shame Scale (GASP)

Ad. Learn more about Creating Surveys -- Download a FREE sample.



Watch Dr. Tangney on YouTube




Connections

My Page    www.suttong.com

My Books  
 AMAZON     GOOGLE PLAY STORE

FACEBOOK  
 Geoff W. Sutton

TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

LinkedIN Geoffrey Sutton  PhD



Publications (many free downloads)
     
  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   (PhD)
     
  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton   (PhD)


Sacred Marriage Scales

Two scales examine couples' perspectives on the role of God in their marriages. The scales are the work of Mahoney, Pargament, and DeMar...