Showing posts with label fear. Show all posts
Showing posts with label fear. Show all posts

Friday, June 17, 2022

COVID-19 Impact Scale

 


Scale name: COVID-19 Impact Scale

Scale overview: The COVID-19 Impact Scale is a 10-item self-report rating scale of the potential impact of COVID-19 in 3 areas of functioning: Economic, Psychological, Social.

Authors: Srinivasan & Sulur Nachimuthu

Response Type: Items are rated on a scale of agreement.

Scale item examples for 3 Subscales

Economic Factor, 4 items

 I have lost job-related income due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Psychological Factor, 4 items

Uncertainties surrounding Coronavirus (COVID-19) causes me enormous anxiety.

Social Factor, 2 items

After the Coronavirus pandemic, I actively avoid people I see sneezing and coughing.

 

Reliability: Cronbach’s alpha was 0.877 in the authors’ study.

Validity: Experts were consulted for content validity. Relationships with other scales were included in the article.

Availability:

See the PsycTESTS reference below.

Permission

Test content may be reproduced and used for non-commercial research and educational purposes without seeking written permission. Distribution must be controlled, meaning only to the participants engaged in the research or enrolled in the educational activity. Any other type of reproduction or 
distribution of test content is not authorized without written permission from the author and publisher. Always include a credit line that contains the source citation and copyright owner when writing about or using any test. (PsycTESTS)

 Cite this page

Sutton, G. W. (2022, June 17). COVID-19 Impact Scale. Assessment, Statistics, and Research. Retrieved from https://statistics.suttong.com/2022/06/covid-19-impact-scale.html

References for the scale

Srinivasan, T., & Sulur Nachimuthu, G. (2022). COVID-19 Impact Scale. PsycTESTS. https://doi.org/10.1037/t80142-000  [This reference contains the scale items.]

Srinivasan, Thilagavathy, & Sulur Nachimuthu, Geetha. (2022). COVID-19 impact on employee flourishing: Parental stress as mediator. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy,14(2), 281-290. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/tra0001037 [This reference reports the study results that used the scale and the psychometric data reported above.]

 

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Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

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Monday, February 22, 2021

Fear Inventory III

 

Fear is a common emotion, and most agree it is a core feeling. Fear surveys are available for children and adults. Many of the fear surveys assess a fear of something such as animals, food, or pain. 


The Fear Inventory III (Taylor & Rachman, 1992) includes 66 items organized in seven subscales: Social Anxiety, Agoraphobic Fears, Fear of Bodily Injury, Death and Illness, Fear of Exposure to Sex/Aggressive Stimuli, Fear of Harmless Animals, Fear of Sadness, and Fear of Anxiety. 


The items are rated on a 5-point scale from not at all (0) to very much (4).


SCOPES domain = Emotion


Permissions:

Test content may be reproduced and used for non-commercial research and educational purposes without seeking written permission. Distribution must be controlled, meaning only to the participants engaged in the research or enrolled in the educational activity. Any other type of reproduction or distribution of test content is not authorized without written permission from the author and publisher. Always include a credit line that contains the source citation and copyright owner when writing about or using any test.

Link to List of Tests


Reference

Taylor, Steven, & Rachman, Stanley J. (1992). Fear and avoidance of aversive affective states: Dimensions and causal relations. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 6(1), 15-25. doi: 10.1016/0887-6185(92)90022-Y

Identity Salience Questionnaire (ISQ)

  Assessment name: Identity Salience Questionnaire (ISQ) Scale overview: The Identity Salience Questionnaire (ISQ) is a 6-item self-repor...