Showing posts with label guilt and morality. Show all posts
Showing posts with label guilt and morality. Show all posts

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Religious and Spiritual Struggles Scale Julie Exline et al.

The Religious and Spiritual Struggles Scale (RSS) assesses six domains of potential struggles, which people may experience. The RSS is a 26-item measure with strong psychometric support.




For a list of the items and more details, see the reference below (Exline, Pargament, Grubbs, & Yali, 2014).

Based on Exline et al. (2014) and a general reading of the topic, I define religious/ spiritual (RS) struggles as experiences of personal concern linked to RS beliefs, practices, values, or experiences, which negatively affect thinking, feelings, or behavior, relationships, or health.


The Six Domains of Spiritual Struggles

Following is a quote from page 208 of the 2014 article, which describes the six domains. I have added bold text to help readers identify each domain. Note, r/s is a common abbreviation for religious/spiritual.
The measure assesses six domains of r/s struggle: divine (negative emotion centered on beliefs about God or a perceived relationship with God), demonic (concern that the devil or evil spirits are attacking an individual or causing negative events), interpersonal (concern about negative experiences with religious people or institutions; interpersonal conflict around religious issues), moral (wrestling with attempts to follow moral principles; worry or guilt about perceived offenses by the self), doubt (feeling troubled by doubts or questions about one’s r/s beliefs), and ultimate meaning (concern about not perceiving deep meaning in one’s life).
The Brief RCOPE also contains items related to spiritual struggles but is more focused on coping than the RSS  I reviewed here. Also note, in the article about the RSS (Exline et al., 2014), the authors view negative religious coping as another way of framing RS struggles.

Scale items

See the references for a complete list of the items and the domains. See the quote above for a description of the items within each of the six domains.

Each item is rated on a 5-point scale where 1 = not at all/does not apply and 5 = a great deal. Researchers average the item scores to obtain a total score and subscale scores.

Spiritual Struggles and Mental Health

All of the RSS subscales predicted mental health criteria.*

The best predictors of emotional distress related to religious and spiritual struggles were the Ultimate Meaning and Divine subscales of the RSS.

The RSS Interpersonal and Moral subscales predicted loneliness

The functioning of the RSS Doubt subscale suggested the possibility that in some cases doubt might not link to distress.

Mental health variables were: Depression, Anxiety, State Anger, Life satisfaction, Loneliness, and Presence of life meaning

Reliability and Validity
The 2014 publication includes extensive details of the RSS development, including data supporting adequate reliability and validity values and construct validity. Alpha values ranged from .85 to .93 across the six subscales in the development study of 1141 undergraduates. 

For a study of the relationship between this RSS measure and the RCOPE scale, see Wilt et al. (2022).


Creating a Survey

The RSSS and other measures may be added to surveys along with other items when researchers follow the permission instructions. Learn more about Creating Surveys. Creating Surveys is  an easy to read and recommended text and resource required by professors at graduate and undergraduate universities.

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Cite this post

Sutton, G. W. (2020, January 22).  Religious and Spiritual Struggles Scale Julie Exline et al. Assessment, Statistics, and Research. Retrieved from  https://statistics.suttong.com/2020/01/religious-and-spiritual-struggles-scale.html

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Resource Link- list of tests on this blog:  A – Z Test Index


References

Exline, Julie J., Pargament, Kenneth I., Grubbs, Joshua B., & Yali, Ann Marie. (2014). The Religious and Spiritual Struggles Scale: Development and initial validation. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 6(3), 208-222. doi:https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0036465

Exline, J. J., Pargament, K. I., Grubbs, J. B., & Yali, A. M. (2014). Religious and Spiritual Struggles Scale [Database record]. Retrieved from PsycTESTS. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/t36191-000

Wilt, J. A., Exline, J. J., & Pargament, K. I. (2022). Coping with religious and spiritual struggles: Religious and secular techniques. Spirituality in Clinical Practice. https://doi.org/10.1037/scp0000289.supp (Supplemental)

The RSS scale contains items that may be useful to clinicians considering religious and spiritual concerns raised by counseling clients.

Learn more about counseling statistics inApplied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE















See how to include spirituality and other items in survey research in Creating Surveys on AMAZON    or    GOOGLE










A related book


        by Pargament and Exline




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Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Measuring Guilt and Shame with the GASP (Guilt and Shame Scale)





Taya Cohen of Carnegie Mellon University has made the Guilt and Shame Proneness Scale (GASP) available online. Here’s what Dr. Cohen said about the scale in 2011. I’ll include a link to the full scale below.

The Guilt and Shame Proneness scale (GASP) measures individual differences in the propensity to experience guilt and shame across a range of personal transgressions. The GASP contains four fouritem subscales: GuiltNegativeBehaviorEvaluation (GuiltNBE), GuiltRepair, ShameNegativeSelfEvaluation (ShameNSE), and ShameWithdraw.

Each item on the GASP is rated on a 7-point scale from 1 = very unlikely to 7 = very likely.

Here’s an example of an item from the GASP scale.

_____ 1. After realizing you have received too much change at a store, you decide to keep it because the salesclerk doesn't notice. What is the likelihood that you would feel uncomfortable about keeping the money?

Information about reliability, validity, and factor structure can be found in the 2011 reference below. The article reports the results of several studies. One interesting finding is the relationship of both shame and guilt to morality--they share some common features. People high in both guilt and shame are less likely to engage in unethical business behavior. 

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There’s more to the discussion than I have stated here so, do see the entire article.

Finding the GASP scale

If the link no longer works, see the 2011 reference below.

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References

Cohen, T. R., Wolf, S. T., Panter, A. T., & Insko, C. A. (2011). Introducing the GASP scale: A new measure of guilt and shame proneness. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100(5), 947966. doi: 10.1037/a0022641 Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2011-08412-001

Wolf, S. T., Cohen, T. R., Panter, A. T., & Insko, C. A. (2010). Shame proneness and guilt proneness: Toward the further understanding of reactions to public and private transgressions. Self & Identity, 9, 337362. doi: 10.1080/15298860903106843

You may also be interested in a related post about Test of Self-Conscious Affect (TOSCA).

Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index



Getting permission to use the GASP
APA is the copyright owner. Here is the link regarding copyright permission:

Connections

My Page    www.suttong.com

My Books  
 AMAZON     GOOGLE PLAY STORE

FACEBOOK  
 Geoff W. Sutton

TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

LinkedIN Geoffrey Sutton  PhD



Publications (many free downloads)
     
  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   (PhD)
     
  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton   (PhD)


Belief in God Scale

  Assessment name: Belief in God Scale Scale overview: Authors: D. Randles et al. (2015). Response Type: Items are rated on a scale ...