Thursday, September 8, 2022

Adult Decision Making Competence ADMC

 


Measure name: Adult Decision-Making Competence ADMC

Overview: The Adult Decision-Making Competence measure consists of a set of seven decision-making tasks designed to assess different aspects of decision-making.

 Response Type: The responses vary with the task.

Scale items: The Adult Decision-Making Competence measure includes the following seven tasks. The numbers in parentheses are Cronbach alphas and test-retest values.

Resistance to Framing (.62, .58)

Recognizing Social Norms (.64, .46)

Under/Overconfidence (.77, .47)

Applying Decision Rules (.73, .77)

Consistency in Risk Perception (.72, .51)

Resistance to Sunk Costs (.54, .61)

Path Independence (.75, .28)

See Appendix A of the 2007 article for a lengthy list of sample items for the 7 task categories mentioned above.

 

Reliability:

Cronbach’s Alpha and test-retest values were reported in Table 2 of the 2007 article referenced below. See the values next to the 7 tasks above.

Validity:

The 2007 article includes the results of factor analyses. In addition, the authors reported correlations between the Adult Decision-Making Competence and a variety of other measures such as SES, Raven, Nelson-Denny, Decision-Making Outcomes, and Decision-Making Styles.

 

Availability or Contact Information

From the article

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Wa¨ndi Bruine de Bruin, Department of Social and Decision Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213. E-mail: wandi@cmu.edu

 

Reference for the scale

Bruine de Bruin, W., Parker, A. M., & Fischhoff, B. (2007). Individual differences in adult decision-making competence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology92(5), 938–956. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.92.5.938

 

Reference for using scales in research:

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Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

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Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

 

 

NOTICE:

The information about scales and measures is provided for clinicians and researchers based on professional publications. The links to authors, materials, and references can change. You may be able to locate details by contacting the main author of the original article or another author on the article list.

 

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College Student Stress Scale CSSS

 


Scale name: College Student Stress Scale

Scale overview: The College Student Stress Scale is an 11-item self-report assessment of college students’ response to items about distress, feeling anxious, or questioning their ability.

 

Response Type: Items are rated on a scale of frequency of occurrence from 1 = Never  to 5 = Very Often.

Scale instructions and items

For the following items, report how often each has occurred this semester using the following scale

Never

Rarely

Sometimes

Often

Very Often

1

2

3

4

5

 

Examples (See the reference for the wording of the 11 items.)

Item 1. asks about personal relationships

Item 2. asks about family

 

Reliability: Cronbach’s alpha = .87 in a sample of 185 college students (Feldt & Koch, 2011)

Validity: Findings from a follow-up study revealed strong convergent validity with the Perceived Stress Scale (r = .80).  The authors also reported “Zero-order coefficients of correlation indicated that the CSSS total score is significantly correlated with neuroticism (large effect size) and also test anxiety and self-efficacy for learning and performance (both medium effect size)” (Feldt & Koch, 2011)

 

Availability:

The full text of the scale is available on PsycTESTS

Permissions:

Test content may be reproduced and used for non-commercial research and educational purposes without seeking written permission. Distribution must be controlled, meaning only to the participants engaged in the research or enrolled in the educational activity. Any other type of reproduction or distribution of test content is not authorized without written permission from the author and publisher. Always include a credit line that contains the source citation and copyright owner when writing about or using any test.

 

References for the scale

Feldt, R. C. (2008). College Student Stress Scale [Database record]. Retrieved from PsycTESTS. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/t07526-000

Feldt, R. C., & Koch, C. (2011). Reliability and Construct Validity of the College Student Stress Scale. Psychological Reports108(2), 660–666. https://doi.org/10.2466/02.08.13.16.PR0.108.2.660-666

 

Reference for using scales in research:

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Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

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Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

 

 

NOTICE:

The information about scales and measures is provided for clinicians and researchers based on professional publications. The links to authors, materials, and references can change. You may be able to locate details by contacting the main author of the original article or another author on the article list.

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

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FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

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Read published articles:

 

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  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, September 7, 2022

Attitudes and Experiences of Evangelical Christians with Mental Distress

 


Scale name: Attitudes and Experiences of Evangelical Christians with Mental Distress

Scale overview: Lloyd and Waller (2020) used nine items to assess the relationship of spiritual etiology to mental distress in a British sample (n = 446).

 

Response Type and items:

The 9-questions were organized into three groups. Respondents were presented with different response options depending on the question.

1. Spiritualization of Mental Distress 1-4

Example: Has your current or previous church or related teaching taught that mental distress was the result of demons, spirits or generational curses? Response options were yes, no, or unsure.

2. Views on secular/psychological treatments 5 – 7.

Example: 5. Do you believe psychological treatments, such as therapy, can be successful in treating mental distress? Response options were yes, no, or unsure. Questions 6-7 asked about church support.

3. Interaction with the Church community 8-9

Example: Overall, how do you feel about your church’s attitude towards mental distress? This was rated on a 5-point scale of very positive to very negative. The next items asked, “How has your interaction with the church, in relation to your mental health, affected your faith?” Response options were Strengthened it, Not impacted it, or Weakened it.

The researchers also asked about the cause of mental distress. Respondents had five options. Examples include traumatic or negative life experiences and Other spiritual causes (generational curses, demonic, the occult, etc.)

Results

The researchers reported the percentage of responses endorsed in two tables and provided a summary in the text. In the discussion, they note differences with similar surveys in the United States

Availability:

The questions can be found in the article below. The 9-questions are in Table 1 along with the answers.

Reference for the scale

Christopher E. M. Lloyd & Robert M. Waller (2020): Demon? Disorder? Or none of the above? A survey of the attitudes and experiences of evangelical Christians with mental distress, Mental Health, Religion & Culture, DOI: 10.1080/13674676.2019.1675148

Pdf found on Researchgate 7 September 2022

 

Reference for using scales in research:

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Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Buy Applied Statistics for Counselors

 

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Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

 NOTICE:

The information about scales and measures is provided for clinicians and researchers based on professional publications. The links to authors, materials, and references can change. You may be able to locate details by contacting the main author of the original article or another author on the article list.

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

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Read published articles:

 

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Friday, September 2, 2022

frugal models or simple rules in statistics

 Frugal models or simple rules are prediction models using only a few variables. The approach is based on findings that in behavioural research many predictors are correlated with each other thus, a few variables with minimal to zero intercorrelations may be more powerful and simpler to understand and use.


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You can read many published articles at no charge:

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cross-validated correlation

 Cross-validated correlation refers to validating relationships between studied variables in a new sample.


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Sunday, August 21, 2022

Reading Experimental Research - A Student Guide

 

READING EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH:

QUESTIONS TO GUIDE YOUR ANALYSIS

Geoffrey W. Sutton, Ph.D.

 

Use the following questions to help you read psychological experiments. With experience, the questions should become a natural part of your analysis.

 

Who are the authors?

When was the study published?

Where do the authors write?

How do you contact the lead author?

Which journal published the article?

How was the research funded?

What might the above situation suggest about the research?

What was studied (variables)?

Why was it studied (need, importance)?

What theory or theories provide the context for the study?

What have previous studies found?

What was expected (purpose, hypotheses)?

Whom (describe the participants)?

Age

Gender

Ethnicity

Other key variables

How did the authors operationally define their variables?

How to (what procedures were followed)?

How did they control for possible confounding effects (internal validity)?

How were the data analyzed?

What happened (what did the authors discover in each experiment)?

So what (how are the findings related to the theory and hypotheses)?

How far can we generalize (limitations and external validity)?

What’s next (what do the authors suggest we should no next)?

How credible are their sources (relevance of the reference list)?

 

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Thursday, August 18, 2022

Self-Censorship Orientation (SCO)

 


Scale name: Self-Censorship Orientation (SCO)

Scale overview: The Self-Censorship Orientation (SCO) is a 14-item scale designed to measure self-censorship, which the authors define as “intentionally and voluntarily withholding information from others in absence of formal obstacles.”

Authors: Keren Sharvit et al. See the 2018 reference for the list of authors.

Response Type: Items are rated on a scale of agreement from 1 = disagree to 4 = agree and 5 = undecided.

Subscales and items

  The authors identified two factors or subscales.

1. Self-censorship

The first dimension, labeled “self-censorship”, reflects the tendency to conceal information that is seen as threatening.” (p. 347)

Example: 1 If I would encounter problematic conduct among my group members, I would feel responsible to bring that information to light.

2. Disclosure

The second dimension, labeled “disclosure”, reflects the tendency to disseminate critical information.”

Example: 9. People who disclose credible information to external sources, which exposes my group to criticism, should be condemned.

 

Reliability:

Values from stage 2:

Self-censorship: Alpha = .84, Rtt =.61

Disclosure: Alpha = .90, Rtt =.56

 

Validity: The authors reported exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. 

They also report correlations with other measures (see Table 4) used in studies described in the 2018 article. Read more about test validity.

 

Availability:

The items are included in the Sharvit et al. (2018) article listed below.

 

Permissions:

The author contact in the article is: ksharvit@psy.haifa.ac.il

 

Reference for the scale

Sharvit, K., Bar-Tal, D., Hameiri, B., Zafran, A., Shahar, E., & Raviv, A. (2018). Self-Censorship Orientation: Scale development, correlates and outcomes. Journal of Social and Political Psychology, 6(2), 331–363. https://doi.org/10.5964/jspp.v6i2.859

Related reference

Hayes, A. F., Glynn, C. J., & Shanahan, J. (2005a). Willingness to self-censor: A construct and measurement tool for public opinion research. International Journal of Public Opinion Research, 17, 298-323. doi:10.1093/ijpor/edh073

 

Comment:

This scale focuses on self-censorship of information in contrast to the Willingness to self-censor (WTSC) measure, which focused on opinions (Hayes et al. 2005).

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on     

   AMAZON 

or  GOOGLE BOOKS

 


 

 Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors 

on AMAZON 


or GOOGLE

 


 

Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

  

NOTICE:

The information about scales and measures is provided for clinicians and researchers based on professional publications. The links to authors, materials, and references can change. You may be able to locate details by contacting the main author of the original article or another author on the article list.

 

Links to Connections


Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

  AMAZON      

 

  GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

   PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

photo note: From Bing images free to share and use

 

 

Identity Salience Questionnaire (ISQ)

  Assessment name: Identity Salience Questionnaire (ISQ) Scale overview: The Identity Salience Questionnaire (ISQ) is a 6-item self-repor...