Monday, June 20, 2022

Parent-Child Relationship Scale CPRS Review

 


Scale name: Parent-Child Relationship Scale CPRS

Scale overview: The Parent-Child Relationship Scale (CPRS) is a 15-item parent self-report rating of relational conflict and closeness.

Response Type: Items are rated on a scale of applicability from 1 to 5. Instructions and number terms are as follows.

Each items uses the same five point scale.

Please assign the following values to each response:

1 = definitely does not apply

2 = not really

3 = neutral, not sure

4 = applies somewhat

5 = definitively applies

Subscales = 2

    Conflict 8-items: 2, 4, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

    Closeness 7- items: 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 15

Sample Scale items

I share an affectionate, warm relationship with my child.

My child and I always seem to be struggling with each other.

Scale statistics

See Table 2 of the article below for means and standard deviations for mothers and fathers relationship ratings with boys and girls on each subscale at both time periods of age 54 months and first grade.

Reliability:

Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Separate values were reported for mothers and fathers at two times: 54 months and first grade.

Conflict subscale: Maternal: @54 m and first grade = .84. Paternal: @54m = .90, @ Grade 1 = .78

Closeness subscale: Maternal @54m = .69, @ Grade 1 = .64. Paternal @54m = .72, @ Grade 1 = .74

The relationship between the subscales was low, r = .16.

 

Validity:

See the article for details. The authors obtained ratings of observed interactions. Also, there are correlations between subscale scores and the Child Behavior Checklist and the Social Skills Rating System.

 

Availability:

Primary contact: Kate Driscoll PhD Katherine.driscoll@childrensharvard.edu

The scale https://www.frpn.org/asset/measures-father-child-relationship-quality

The article about the scale:  https://education.virginia.edu/sites/default/files/uploads/resourceLibrary/Mothers_and_Fathers_Perceptions_%28Driscoll_Pianta%29.pdf

Cite this post

Sutton, G. W. (2022, June 20). The Parent-Child Relationship Scale (CPRS) review. Assessment, Statistics, and Research. Retrieved from

Reference article for the scale

Driscoll, K., & Pianta, R. C.  (2011). Mothers' and fathers' perceptions of conflict and closeness in parent-child relationships during early childhood.  Journal of Early Childhood and Infant Psychology, 7, 1-24.

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 

 




Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 





Test Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

  

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Saturday, June 18, 2022

Dad Data Single Parents and Children




When it comes to family structure, there's been considerable change in the United States.


According to the 2020 census data from census.gov, 70 percent of American children live in a two-parent home--that is down from 85% in 1968.

About 15.5% of children only live with their mothers.

About 4.5 of children only live with their fathers.

About 4% of children are not living with their parents- they may be with other relatives including grandparents.

The link to the data

https://www.census.gov/library/stories/2021/04/number-of-children-living-only-with-their-mothers-has-doubled-in-past-50-years.html

Does it matter? Two Studies


The analyses found that children in nondisrupted two-biological-parent and nondisrupted stepparent households consistently made greater progress in their math and reading performances over time than their peers in nondisrupted single-parent, disrupted two-biological-parent, and disrupted alternative families with multiple transitions. Sun & Li 2011

**********
Children from divorced families had more behavior problems compared with a propensity score-matched sample of children from intact families according to both teachers and mothers. They exhibited more internalizing and externalizing problems at the first assessment after the parents’ separation and at the last available assessment (age 11 for teacher reports, or age 15 for mother reports). Divorce also predicted both short-term and long-term rank-order increases in behavior problems. Associations between divorce and child behavior problems were moderated by family income (assessed before the divorce) such that children from families with higher incomes prior to the separation had fewer internalizing problems than children from families with lower incomes prior to the separation. Higher levels of pre-divorce maternal sensitivity and child IQ also functioned as protective factors for children of divorce. Mediation analyses showed that children were more likely to exhibit behavior problems after the divorce if their post-divorce home environment was less supportive and stimulating, their mother was less sensitive and more depressed, and their household income was lower. Weaver & Schofield, 2015

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Father-Daughter Relationship Scale

 


Scale name: Father Daughter Relationship Scale

Scale overview: The Father-Daughter Relationship Scale is a 9-item scale of perceived closeness, which was studied in a sample of young women.

Authors: Jennie Brown, Laura Thompson, David Trafimow

Response Type: All items are rated on a scale of 4 to 7 values depending on the questions about time or closeness.

Subscales = 2

Closeness = 4 items

Time together = 5 items

Sample: One sample of mostly Euro-American or Hispanic American women between age 17 and 25.

Reliability: Cronbach’s alpha = .89

Validity: Factor analysis reported.

 

Availability: See Appendix A, p. 214.

 

Reference for the scale

Brown, J., Thompson, L. A., & Trafimow, D. (2002). The father-daughter relationship rating scale. Psychological Reports90(1), 212–214. https://doi.org/10.2466/PR0.90.1.212-214

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 

Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 

 


 

Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

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FOLLOW me on

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Read published articles:

 

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Friday, June 17, 2022

COVID-19 Impact Scale

 


Scale name: COVID-19 Impact Scale

Scale overview: The COVID-19 Impact Scale is a 10-item self-report rating scale of the potential impact of COVID-19 in 3 areas of functioning: Economic, Psychological, Social.

Authors: Srinivasan & Sulur Nachimuthu

Response Type: Items are rated on a scale of agreement.

Scale item examples for 3 Subscales

Economic Factor, 4 items

 I have lost job-related income due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Psychological Factor, 4 items

Uncertainties surrounding Coronavirus (COVID-19) causes me enormous anxiety.

Social Factor, 2 items

After the Coronavirus pandemic, I actively avoid people I see sneezing and coughing.

 

Reliability: Cronbach’s alpha was 0.877 in the authors’ study.

Validity: Experts were consulted for content validity. Relationships with other scales were included in the article.

Availability:

See the PsycTESTS reference below.

Permission

Test content may be reproduced and used for non-commercial research and educational purposes without seeking written permission. Distribution must be controlled, meaning only to the participants engaged in the research or enrolled in the educational activity. Any other type of reproduction or 
distribution of test content is not authorized without written permission from the author and publisher. Always include a credit line that contains the source citation and copyright owner when writing about or using any test. (PsycTESTS)

 Cite this page

Sutton, G. W. (2022, June 17). COVID-19 Impact Scale. Assessment, Statistics, and Research. Retrieved from https://statistics.suttong.com/2022/06/covid-19-impact-scale.html

References for the scale

Srinivasan, T., & Sulur Nachimuthu, G. (2022). COVID-19 Impact Scale. PsycTESTS. https://doi.org/10.1037/t80142-000  [This reference contains the scale items.]

Srinivasan, Thilagavathy, & Sulur Nachimuthu, Geetha. (2022). COVID-19 impact on employee flourishing: Parental stress as mediator. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy,14(2), 281-290. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/tra0001037 [This reference reports the study results that used the scale and the psychometric data reported above.]

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 




 

Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 








Resource Link to more tests and measures:  A – Z Test Index

 

 Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

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Monday, June 13, 2022

Christian Nationalism Scale

 


Scale name: Christian Nationalism Scale

Scale overview: The Christian Nationalism Scale consists of six-items commonly used to examine beliefs about the US government and Christianity.

 Response Type: Items are rated on a scale of agreement

1 = strongly agree

2 = agree

3 = disagree

4 = strongly disagree

5 = undecided.

Scale items

The federal government should declare the United States as a Christian nation.

The federal government should advocate Christian values.

The federal government should enforce strict separation of church and state. (reverse coded)

The federal government should allow the display of religious symbols in public spaces.

The success of the United States is part of God's plan.

The federal government should allow prayer in public schools.

 

Reliability: In a 2018 article, Whitehead et al. reported Cronbach’s alpha of 0.86 for the six items.

Validity: See the Factor Analysis reported by Whitehead et al. (2018) and a different analysis by Davis (2022). Several studies report predictive validity—see for example Davis (2022).

 

Availability: The items can be found in various sources. Such as Davis (2022). Davis traced the history of the items to Baylor Religion Survey (BRS), Wave II (2007). However, see the items on the 2005 BRS survey

 

Reference for the scale

Davis, N. T. (2022). The psychometric properties of the Christian nationalism scale. Politics and Religion.(unpublished draft version date 05/11/2022). Retrieved from https://psyarxiv.com/sntv7/download/?format=pdf

Whitehead, Andrew L., Perry, Samuel L. and Baker, Joseph O. 2018. “Make America Christian again: Christian nationalism and voting for Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election.” Sociology of Religion, 79(2), pp.147-171.

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 



Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

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Read published articles:

 

  Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

  ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, June 11, 2022

Creative Charts for Your Data

 


This stunning chart is worth a look by all those who present data at conferences or in classes. 

The source of this chart and four more useful charts is an article on inflation by Flowers and Siegel of the Washington Post 10 June 2022.

I recommend a look at the other charts as well.

An additional comment. Charts about economic issues like the cost of food and energy are also about human behavior. People raise prices and people pay more for what they need or want. Too often we separate the cost of things from what people are doing.


I write about presenting data using charts in Creating Surveys.


Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE








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Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

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Read my published articles:

 

ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

 

Wednesday, June 8, 2022

Spiritual Modeling Self-Efficacy (SMSE)

 


Scale name: Spiritual Modeling Self-Efficacy (SMSE)

Scale overview: The Spiritual Modeling Self-Efficacy scale is a 10-item self-report measure of a person’s ability to learn from spiritual models.

The scale is based on Bandura’s social learning theory. People learn best from models when they perceive they have the capacity to do what the model does (self-efficacy).

 Read more about self-efficacy.

Authors: Doug Oman et al. (See reference article below.)

Response Type: Respondents were instructed to rate each item on a scale from 0 (cannot do at all) to 100 (certain can do) representing the degree of certainty that they could perform the action described in each item.

Sample items

1. Identify persons in my family or community who, at least in some

respects, offer good spiritual examples for me

3. Be aware almost daily of the spiritual actions and attitudes of people in my

family and community who are good spiritual examples

 

Subscales = 2

SMSE-C five items refer to community models

SMSE-P five items refer to prominent models

 

Reliability: 7-week test-retest reliability was .83 in Oman et al. (2009).

Validity: The authors report evidence of construct, divergent, and convergent validity in the article.

 

Availability: The items can be found in Table 1 on page 283 of the article.

Permissions -- if identified

Contact author:  Doug Oman, School of Public Health, 50 University Hall #7360, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94971-7360.

E-mail: dougoman@post.harvard.edu

Reference for the scale

 Oman, D., Thoresen, C. E., Park, C. L., Shaver, P. R., Hood, R. W., & Plante, T. G. (2012). Spiritual modeling self-efficacy. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 4(4), 278–297. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0027941

Additional related reference

Oman, D., Thoresen, C. E., Park, C. L., Shaver, P. R., Hood, R. W., & Plante, T. G.  2009). How does one become spiritual? The Spiritual Modeling Inventory of Life Environments (SMILE). Mental Health, Religion & Culture, 12, 427–456. doi: 10.1080/13674670902758257

 

Reference for using scales in research:

Creating Surveys on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 

 

 




Reference for clinicians on understanding assessment

Applied Statistics Concepts for Counselors on AMAZON or GOOGLE

 


 






 



Test Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

 More Self-Efficacy Scales

Academic Self-Efficacy Scale >>    ASE

Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Anxiety Scale >>     MSEAQ

Self-Efficacy Scale (General) >>    SES

Reading Self-Efficacy scales >>    RSES





 

 

 

Links to Connections

Checkout My Website   www.suttong.com

  

See my Books

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FOLLOW me on

   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton  

  

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Read my published articles:

 

ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

Academia   Geoff W Sutton   

 

 

 

 

 


Parent-Child Relationship Scale CPRS Review

  Scale name: Parent-Child Relationship Scale CPRS Scale overview: The Parent-Child Relationship Scale (CPRS) is a 15-item parent self-re...