Monday, November 23, 2020

Lifespan Self-Esteem Scale

 


The Lifespan Self-Esteem Scale is a 4-item measure of self-esteem. The items are rated on a 5-point scale.

Self-esteem is a dimension of self-concept. Self-esteem is the value people place on themselves. We learn our value in various social contexts. Self-esteem is also related to the dimension of self-concept called self-efficacy.

Format

The items are presented with pictures of faces representing five different responses. (1 = really sad, 2 = sad, 3 = neutral, 4 = happy, 5 = really happy). The response options are also illustrated with faces depicting the appropriate feeling (really sad = crying face, sad = slight frown, neutral = flat mouth, happy = slight smile, really happy = open-mouthed smile).

Sample item

1. How do you feel about yourself?

Resources

See the SELF Lab at UC-Davis for a copy (Word and PDF) of the scale and research identifying its psychometric properties: https://selflab.ucdavis.edu/lifespan-self-esteem-scale-lse-0

There is also a manual for use in administering the scale to young children and people with limited literacy.

Contacts: “Please email Michelle Harris at micharris@ucdavis.edu or Kali Trzesniewski at ktrz@ucdavis.edu if you have any questions about the scale. Thank you for your interest!”

Related Scales

Academic Self-Efficacy Scale

Academic Self-Efficacy Scale – For Students

New General Self-Efficacy Scale

Personal Self-Concept Questionnaire

Read about creating scales and using scales in surveys: CREATING SURVEYS 


References

Harris, Michelle A., Donnellan, M. Brent, & Trzesniewski, Kali H. (2018). The Lifespan Self-Esteem Scale: Initial validation of a new measure of global self-esteem. Journal of Personality Assessment, 100(1), 84-95. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00223891.2016.1278380

Harris, M. A., Donnellan, M. B., & Trzesniewski, K. H. (2018). Lifespan Self-Esteem Scale [Database record]. Retrieved from PsycTESTS. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/t65962-000


Links to Connections

Checkout My Page    www.suttong.com

  

My Books  AMAZON          and             GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Articles: Academia   Geoff W Sutton   ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

Subscribe to my Travel Channel on YouTube

 

Tuesday, November 17, 2020

Personal Self-Concept Questionnaire (PSQ)

 

The Personal Self-Concept Questionnaire (PSQ) measures self-concept based on responses to 18 items, which are grouped into four categories: Self-fulfilment, Autonomy, Honesty, and Emotional self-concept.


Reliability and Validity

In the first study, alpha = .85 and in study two, .83.

Data analysis supported a four-dimensional model (see the categories above). Positive correlations with other self-concept measures were significant.

Other notes

The authors estimated it took about 10 minutes to complete the PSQ.

Their first study included people ages 12 to 36 (n = 506). In the second study, ages were 15 to 65 (= 1135).

Availability

The PSQ items can be found in the Goñi et al. (2011) article (see the reference below). The 18-items can be found in Table 1 on page 512. Notice the 4-items eliminated from the 22 item measure used in the first study.


Reference

Goñi, E., Madariaga, J. M., Axpe, I., & Goñi, A. (2011). Structure of the Personal Self-Concept (PSC) Questionnaire. International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology, 11, 509-522.

Read more about Self and Self-Concepts in Psychology

Monday, November 16, 2020

Academic Self-Efficacy Scale for Students

 

High School Students/ Bing images Free to use

The ASESS is designed to measure students’ opinions about their ability to perform well on academic tasks. High scoring students earn better grades and are more persistent compared to low scoring students. Those with high scores also use more effective cognitive strategies, organize their time more efficiently, and are better at self-regulation.

Format

The 11-items are rated on a 1 to 5 basis from “No Confidence at all” to “Complete Confidence.”

Instructions

The instructions on the scale ask the students: “How much confidence do you have that you can successfully...”

Sample Items

1. Finish homework assignments by deadlines?

8. Remember information presented in class and textbooks?

Availability

When I wrote this post, the scale could be found at this link:  http://academics.ivc.edu/success/Documents/Self%20Regulation%20Assesment.pdf

The scale is reported as an adaptation from Zimmerman et al. (1992) and Chemers et al. (2001).

Learn more about creating surveys in the highly recommended,

Creating Surveys --

available on AMAZON   and   GOOGLE BOOKS. 

 


Read More about Self-Efficacy and its relationship to Self-Concept

References

Chemers, M., Hu, L., & Garcia, B. (2001). Academic self-efficacy and first-year college student performance and adjustment. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93(1), 55-64.

Zimmerman, B.J., Bandura, A., & Martinez-Pons, M. (1992). Self-motivation for academic attainment: The role of self-efficacy beliefs and personal goal-setting. American Educational Research Journal, 29, 663-676.

Links to Connections

Checkout My Page    www.suttong.com

  

My Books  AMAZON          and             GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Articles: Academia   Geoff W Sutton   ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 


 

Academic Self-Efficacy Scale ASE

 

The Academic Self-Efficacy Scale is an application of Self-Efficacy Theory to examine the relationship between self-efficacy and academic performance. The work of Chemers et al. (2001) has been widely cited.

Format

The 8-items are rated on a 7-point Likert-type scale ranging from 1 = Very Untrue to 7 = Very True.

Sample Items

2. I know how to take notes.

6. I usually do very well in school and at academic tasks.

 Reliability, Validity, and Other Research notes

In the article describing the development and use of the ASE, the authors observed: “As predicted, academic self-efficacy was significantly and directly related to academic expectations and academic performance.” (Chemers et al., 2001, p. 61)

 Sutton et al. (2011) reported alpha of .83 in their study of academic self-esteem and personal strengths. ASE was highly positively correlated with ACT scores (.24) and GPA (.39).

An Arabic version of the ASE developed by Almohazie (2018) revealed Cronbach’s alphas of .935 for men and .918 for women. The average item mean was 5.38 ( SD  = 1.14).

For help on writing items and organizing surveys, See Creating Surveys  on AMAZON  and

GOOGLE BOOKS 



Availability of the ASE:  Contact person is Martin Chemers, Professor Emeritus, at University of California, Santa Cruz mchemers@ucsc.edu 

KEY WORDS: Academic Self-Efficacy, Academic achievement, personal strengths

 References

Almohazie, M. F. (2018). Reliability and validity of an Arabic translation of academic self-efficacy scale (ASE) on students at King Faisal University. Available from Wayne State University Dissertations. 1910. https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/1910

Chemers, M. M., Hu, L., & Garcia, B. F. (2001). Academic self-efficacy and first-year college student performance and adjustment. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93, 55-64.

Sutton, G. W., Phillips, S., Lehnert, A. B., Bartle, B. W., & Yokomizo, P. (2011). Strengths, academic self-efficacy, admission test scores, and GPA in a Christian university sample. Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 30, 28-36.  Academia Link    Research Gate Link

 Read More about Self-Efficacy and its relationship to Self-Concept

Links to Connections

Checkout My Page    www.suttong.com

  

My Books  AMAZON          and             GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Articles: Academia   Geoff W Sutton   ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

Friday, November 13, 2020

Gender Identity-Dysphoria Questionnaire-Adult Adolescent

 

Gender Identity/ Gender Dysphoria Questionnaire for Adolescents and Adults (GIDYQ-AA)

The GIDYQ-AA is a 27-item scale with separate versions for females and males.

Format:

Each item is rated on a 5-point scale based on the past 12-months. The rating text is as follows (along with numerical score): Always (coded as 1), Often (2), Sometimes (3), Rarely (4), or Never (5).

Versions

There are two version: a female and a male version.

Sample Items

   Female

1. In the past 12 months, have you felt satisfied being a woman?

2. In the past 12 months, have you felt uncertain about your gender, that is, feeling somewhere inbetween a woman and a man?

   Male

3. In the past 12 months, have you felt pressured by others to be a man, although you don't really feel like one?

 

Permission to use the questionnaire

Contact the publisher (Taylor & Francis) and corresponding author (Ken_Zucker@camh.net)

Taylor & Francis article link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00224490701586730

Scale location

The full set of 27-items for both versions is available at the PsychTESTS database—see the reference below.

 References

Deogracias, J. J., Johnson, L. L., Meyer-Bahlburg, H. F. L., Kessler, S. J., Schober, J. M., & Zucker, K. J. (2007). The gender identity/gender dysphoria questionnaire for adolescents and adults. Journal of Sex Research, 44(4), 370-379. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00224490701586730

Deogracias, J. J., Johnson, L. L., Meyer-Bahlburg, H. F. L., Kessler, S. J., Schober, J. M., & Zucker, K. J. (2007). Gender Identity/Gender Dysphoria Questionnaire for Adolescents and Adults. PsycTESTS. https://doi.org/10.1037/t63032-000

Learn more about test statistics in Applied Statistics: Concepts for Counselors available on AMAZON.com      AMAZON UK  and in many other worldwide markets served by AMAZON.  GOOGLE BOOKS


Learn more about surveys in Creating Surveys on AMAZON,    AMAZON UK   and GOOGLE BOOKS


Links to Connections

Checkout My Page    www.suttong.com

  

My Books  AMAZON          and             GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Articles: Academia   Geoff W Sutton   ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

Thursday, November 12, 2020

New General Self-Efficacy Scale

 

Bing Images/free to share and use

General Self-Efficacy refers to a trait in contrast to more specific dimensions of self-efficacy. The New General Self-Efficacy Scale (NGSES) was developed by Chen et al. (2001). The scale consists of 8-items.

The assessment of Self-Efficacy may be relevant in psychotherapy, career planning, and organizational psychology. Read more about Self-Efficacy Theory.

 

Instructions

Using a 5-point rating scale (1= strongly disagree; 3 = neither agree nor disagree; 5 = strongly agree), respondents show how much they agree with eight statements, such as “Even when things are tough, I can perform quite well.” Researchers then calculate a score for each respondent by taking the average of their ratings.

Sample items

  1. I will be able to achieve most of the goals that I set for myself.
  2. When facing difficult tasks, I am certain that I will accomplish them.

Reliability

The authors reported alpha = .86 and .90 (two times) in study 2 (See Chen et al., 2012).

Validity

The authors reported correlations with several measures in Table 1 (p. 72). The SGSE was positively correlated with the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (r = .75)

Where to find the scale online

https://sparqtools.org/mobility-measure/new-general-self-efficacy-scale/#all-survey-questions

Learn more about assessment in counseling  in Applied Statistics: Concepts for Counselors






Develop surveys to measure Self-Efficacy and other traits using Creating Surveys






Read More about Self-Efficacy and its relationship to Self-Concept

Reference

Chen, G., Gully, S. M., & Eden, D. (2001). Validation of a new general self-efficacy scale. Organizational Research Methods4(1), 62-83.

Links to Connections

Checkout My Page    www.suttong.com

  

My Books  AMAZON          and             GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW me on   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Articles: Academia   Geoff W Sutton   ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

Tuesday, November 3, 2020

Experiences in Close Relationships-Relational Structures

 

Experiences in Close Relationships-Relational Structures

 

The ECR-RS is a measure of adult attachment that includes four 9-item subscales for mother, father, romantic partner, and best friend attachment (Fraley et al., 2011a). Statements on the ECR-RS are rated on a 7-point scale (1 = strongly disagree; 7 = strongly agree).

 

Sample items from the ECR-RS

 

I find it easy to depend on this person.

I often worry that this person doesn't really care for me.

 

Reliability values

 

“In our research, the ECR-RS has proven to be quite useful. The test-retest reliability (over 30 days) of the individual scales are approximately .65 for the domain of romantic relationships (including individuals who experienced breakups during the 30-day period) and .80 in the parental domain.” (Chris-Fraley, n.d.)

 

Scale alpha values exceed .90 for each scale, according to Chris-Fraley.

 

Finding the ECR-RS Questionnaire,

Chris-Fraley has a copy of the scale with references and scoring information at the Illinois lab site. http://labs.psychology.illinois.edu/~rcfraley/measures/relstructures.htm

See also the 2011a reference below.

 

Additional Data

 

Chris-Fraley has provided additional references and an Excel sheet for scoring at this link: http://labs.psychology.illinois.edu/~rcfraley/measures/ecrr.htm

 

Learn more about writing items and creating surveys in Creating Surveys   

  Buy on AMAZON  or  GOOGLE BOOKS



References

 

Fraley, R. C., Heffernan, M. E., Vicary, A. M., & Brumbaugh, C. C. (2011a). Experiences in Close Relationships—Relationship Structures Questionnaire [Database record]. Retrieved from PsycTESTS. https://doi.org/10.1037/t08412-000

Fraley, R. C., Heffernan, M. E., Vicary, A. M., & Brumbaugh, C. C. (2011b). The Experiences in Close Relationships—Relationship Structures Questionnaire: A method for assessing attachment orientations across relationships. Psychological Assessment, 23, 615-625. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0022898




Attachment to God Scale

 

The Attachment to God Scale (AGS), like other attachment measures, includes scales for anxious and avoidant dimensions of attachment (Rowatt, 2002). The 9-items are rated on a 7-point scale ranging from (1= strongly disagree; 7 = strongly agree).

 Rowatt and Kirkpatrick (2002) found support for two dimensions and reported Alpha values of .92 for avoidance and .80 for anxious (Rowatt & Kirkpatrick, 2002).

 

Sample items from the AGS

 

God seems to have little or no interest in my personal affairs.

I have a warm relationship with God.

 

Where to find the AGS

 

See the Rowatt (2002) reference below.

 

Related Posts


Attachment and Attachment Theory

Attachment to God

Attachment to God Inventory (AGI)

 

 

References

 

Rowatt, W. C. (2002). Attachment to God Scale [Database record]. Retrieved from PsycTESTS. https://doi.org/10.1037/t00348-000

 

Rowatt, W. C., & Kirkpatrick, L. A. (2002). Two dimensions of attachment to God and their relation to affect, religiosity, and personality constructs. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 41(4), 637-651. https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-5906.00143             Link at Baylor University.

 

Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Perspective Taking and Empathic Concern Scales

 Davis developed a two dimensional approach to assess empathy with items measuring perspective taking and empathic concern.

Each item is measured on a five-point scale from 0 to 4. The anchor labels are "Does not describe me well" to "Describes me well." Some items are reversed scored.

There are 7 perspective taking items and 7 empathic concern items.

Related posts

     Empathy

     Perspective taking


Article Reference

Davis, M. H. (1983). Measuring individual differences in empathy: Evidence for a multidimensional approach. Journal of personality and social psychology, 44(1), 113.

Link to the scales: https://ogg.osu.edu/media/documents/MB%20Stream/PT%20and%20EC.pdf

If you are working on a survey or questionnaire, consider Creating Surveys on AMAZON   Google   and other stores.





Tuesday, October 27, 2020

ABORTION STATISTICS- USA

 


It is no secret that the official position of the Catholic church opposes abortion. Many evangelicals groups also promote antiabortion positions.

The subject of abortion continues to divide Americans as evident in survey data. This has been highlighted recently with the addition of Justice Barrett to the Supreme Court—a judge known for her prolife advocacy. In the summer, Justice Thomas famously attacked the court’s ruling in Roe v. Wade (CNN).

In 2020, most Americans, the majority of whom are Christian, support abortion, though sizable percentages prefer laws that pose some limitations. Some important questions are not asked every year so, some data in the 2020 post refer to 2019, 2018, etc.

The Gallup organization has looked at variations in opinions about abortion. This is helpful as advances in medical science make it possible for the unborn to live outside the womb at younger and younger ages.

So, where do Americans stand on abortion?

79% support a legal abortion under any (29%) or certain circumstances (50%). A small percentage (20%) believe abortion should be illegal in all circumstances.

46% consider themselves prolife and 48%, prochoice. These numbers reflect a close split, especially considering statistical error. But notice how it compares with the 79% support number. Prolife people would appear to allow for abortion under certain circumstances. How questions are asked make a difference. (Read more about variations in positions.)

I study moral psychology so I found the Gallup question about moral acceptability interesting.

44% of Americans consider abortion morally acceptable and 9% reported it depends on the situation—47% opine abortion is morally wrong.

60% of Americans did not want Roe v. Wade overturned in 2019.

How you ask a question makes a difference in the answer you get.

Prolife is probably too vague a concept to be meaningful when it comes to understanding opinions about abortion.

There are more data so, head to the Gallup report for details.

 Read more about abortion

Prolife Movement Approaches Total War

The Faultline Hypothesis and Abortion

Abortion and Prolife 2019

Books on Abortion and Related Topics






       

Learn more about Creating Surveys  


Creating Surveys on GOOGLE






Christian Morality  ALSO ON GOOGLE BOOKS


Links to Connections

My Page    www.suttong.com

  

My Books  AMAZON          and             GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Articles: Academia   Geoff W Sutton   ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 



Friday, October 23, 2020

Biblical Literalism Scale

 The Biblical Literalism Scale (BLS) is a 10-item scale found in an article by Andrew Village (2005).

The content of the scale includes biblical events rated by participants on a scale as follows: ‘definitely happened’, ‘probably happened’, ‘not certain’, ‘probably a story’ or ‘definitely a story.’ High scores indicated a more literal belief.

Findings:

The survey sample consisted of 404 Christian participants. Scores ranged from 10 (all of the items were rated as stories) to 50 (all items rated as “definitely happened”).

Old Testament items were rated as less literal than New Testament items. The average scores were highest in Evangelical churches and lowest in Anglo-Catholic churches.

Correlation of scores with other variables

BLS and frequent charismatic experience (r = .51) (note a)

BLS and frequent Bible reading (r = .47) (note b)

BLS and age (r = -.17)

BLS and education (r = -.14)

Women scored slightly on higher (39.8) literalism than did men (37.2), but the difference was statistically significant.

 Examples of items:

David killed a giant called Goliath.

Jonah was in the belly of a fish (or whale) for three days.

Jesus turned water into wine.

Reliability

The author reported coefficient alpha = .92

Comment

Some items revealed a ceiling effect. For example, “Jesus’ mother was a virgin when she conceived Jesus.” M = 4.4 and SD  = 1.0.

For help creating and analyzing surveys, see Creating Surveys on AMAZON and GOOGLE







Notes

a. Related Post see Measuring Religious Fundamentalism

b. For research and scales measuring biblical fundamentalism, see Counseling and Psychotherapy with Pentecostal and Charismatic Christians

Reference

Village, A. (2005) Factors shaping biblical literalism: a study among Anglican laity. Journal of Beliefs & Values, 26:1, 29-38, DOI: 10.1080/13617670500047566

 

 Links to Connections

My Page    www.suttong.com

  

My Books  AMAZON          and             GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Articles: Academia   Geoff W Sutton   ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 

LinkedIN Geoffrey Sutton  PhD

 

Subscribe to my Travel Channel on YouTube

 

 

Monday, September 28, 2020

Big Five Personality Scales


There are a few scales that measure the Big Five Personality Traits. One acronym is the word OCEAN. Each letter refers to the first letter of a Big Five personality trait.

Scientific studies by Paul Costa and Robert McCrae (1998) established a basis for the five factors known by the acronym OCEAN, which I refer to below.


See Big Five Personality Theory for more details and references.

 

O- Openness to experience includes curiosity, imagination, and creativity. People high in this trait appreciate complexity and originality and enjoy new experiences.

 

C- Conscientiousness describes behavior patterns of self-control and acting in socially acceptable ways. People high in conscientiousness are dependable, work within rules, plan and organize effectively, and have a strong degree of gratification. 

 

E- Extroversion  (aka extraversion) is often considered along with introversion. In a sense, the dimension identifies where a person finds their energy. Extroverts thrive in the presence of others while introverts need to withdraw from people to restore their souls in solitude. 

 

A- Agreeableness refers to patterns of interactions with others and contrasts with disagreeableness. People might describe those high in agreeableness as altruistic, trusting, modest, humble, patient, tactful, polite, kind, loyal, helpful, sensitive, amiable, cheerful, and considerate.

 

N- Neuroticism refers to emotional stability. Sensitive clinicians reframe this term as Emotional Stability. 

Link to a copy of the 44-item Inventory 

https://fetzer.org/sites/default/files/images/stories/pdf/selfmeasures/Personality-BigFiveInventory.pdf

Link to a brief online version:  https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/personality-quiz/

Big Five Reference

 Costa, P. T., Jr., & McCrae, R. R. (1998). Trait theories of personality. In D. F. Barone, M. Hersen, & V. B. Van Hasselt (Eds.), The Plenum series in social/clinical psychology: Advanced personality (p. 103–121). Plenum Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-8580-4_5

 Links to Connections

My Page    www.suttong.com

  

My Books  AMAZON          and             GOOGLE STORE

 

FOLLOW   FACEBOOK   Geoff W. Sutton   TWITTER  @Geoff.W.Sutton

 

PINTEREST  www.pinterest.com/GeoffWSutton

 

Articles: Academia   Geoff W Sutton   ResearchGate   Geoffrey W Sutton 

 

 


Lifespan Self-Esteem Scale

  The Lifespan Self-Esteem Scale is a 4-item measure of self-esteem. The items are rated on a 5-point scale. Self-esteem is a dimension o...