Tuesday, June 7, 2022

Reading Self-Efficacy Scales

 


Scale name:  Reading Self-Efficacy Scales

 

Scale overview: The Reading Self-Efficacy Scales (RSES) measure eight beliefs of students’ capacity to read in a culturally familiar context.

Authors: Heather M. Kelley et al.

Response Type: Students used an 11-point numbered scale (0 to 10) to rate their beliefs about reading. Each of five phrases are linked to more than one number. The five phrases are: Not sure, A Little Sure, Kind of Sure, Sure, Really Sure.

Sample items

When you read in your English Language Arts class, how sure are you that you could successfully …

Identify the main idea of a story.

Identify the place where a story happened.

Scale note: The wording of the scales was similar but modified depending on one of three tasks: General reading (GR), Culturally familiar (CF), Culturally unfamiliar (CU).

Reliability: Internally consistency was measured with Cronbach’s alpha for each scale: GR = .85, CF = .90, CU = .70 (rounded).

Validity: The scale items were developed based on state objectives and benchmarks.

Availability: The full set of items are available in the PsycTESTS reference and in the appendixes to the research article.

Permissions:

The corresponding author is Heather Kelley hkelley@valdosta.edu

The publisher is Routledge Taylor & Francis Group

  Read more about self-efficacy.


Reference for the scales

Kelley, H. M., Siwatu, K. O., Tost, J. R., & Martinez, J. (2015). Reading Self-Efficacy Scales. PsycTESTS. https://doi.org/10.1037/t48033-000

Kelley, H. M., Siwatu, K. O., Tost, J. R., & Martinez, J. (2015). Culturally familiar tasks on reading performance and self-efficacy of culturally and linguistically diverse students. Educational Psychology in Practice, 31(3), 293–313. https://doi.org/10.1080/02667363.2015.1033616

 

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Related Self-Efficacy Scales

Academic Self-Efficacy Scale >> ASE

 Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Anxiety Scale >>  MSEAQ

 Self-Efficacy Scale (General) >> SES


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Monday, June 6, 2022

The Diet Self-Efficacy Scale (DIET-SE)

 


Scale name: The Diet Self Efficacy Scale (DIET-SE)

Scale overview: The Diet Self-Efficacy Scale (DIET-SE) is an 11-item self-report measure. Respondents rate their degree of confidence in managing eating situations.

Authors: Stich et al. (see reference below)

Response Type: A 5-point Likert Type rating of confidence

0 = Not at all

1 = A little confident

2 = Moderately confident

3 = Quite confident

4 = Very confident

Sample items

1. You are having dinner with your family and your favorite meal has been prepared. You finish the first helping and someone says, "Why don't you have some more?" How confident are you that you would turn down a second helping?

5. You are invited to someone's house for dinner and your host is an excellent cook. You often overeat because the food tastes so good. How confident are you that you  would not overeat as a dinner guest?

Subscales = 3

HCF = HIGH CALORIC FOOD TEMPTATIONS

SIF = SOCIAL AND INTERNAL FACTORS

NEE = NEGATIVE EMOTIONAL EVENTS

Reliability:

Test-retest correlations for a 2- to 3-week interval were rtt = .83 for the full scale. Subscale results were: HCF .75, SIF .77, NEE .80

Internal consistency values  ranged from alpha  = .82 to .87 for the full measure and for the subscales, alpha values were HCF .70-.77; SIF  .71-79; NEE .75-.79.

See the Stich et al. (2009) reference for details.

Validity:

Construct validity was evaluated by factor analysis, which supported the three subscales. See the article for evidence of convergent and criterion-related validity.

Availability:

The article can be found in various databases. See Table 1 for the items.

Permissions -- if identified

  Read more about self-efficacy.


Reference for the scale

Stich, C., Knäuper, B., & Tint, A. (2009). A scenario-based measure of dieting self-efficacy: The DIET-SE. Assessment, 16, 16-30. See ResearchGate

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Thursday, May 19, 2022

Assessment of Spirituality and Religious Sentiments (ASPIRES) scale- Short Form

 


Scale name: Assessment of Spirituality and Religious Sentiments (ASPIRES) scale- Short Form

Scale overview: The Assessment of Spirituality and Religious Sentiments scale- Short Form (ASPIRES-SF) is a 13-item scale that measures both religious involvement and spiritual transcendence. Spiritual transcendence refers to the way people create a sense of meaning and purpose for their lives.

Authors: Ralph L. Piedmont et al. (see below)

Response Type: The ASPIRES-SF is a self-report assessment with different ratings for the two subscales—see below.

Subscales = 2

1.  Religiosity Index

  4-religious activity (e.g., prayer, reading religious literature) items are rated 1-7 to indicate frequency.

2.  Spiritual Transcendence Scale

  9-items are rated on a 1-5 scale of agreement. The items refer to a sense of meaning. These 9-items reflect 3 facets: Prayer fulfillment, Universality, and Connectedness.

Reliability: In the 2008 reference (see below) alpha values were .72 for the total transcendence scale and .79 for the Religiosity Index.

Validity: Several studies have reported on the results of the factor structure of the longer form of ASPIRES. The 2008 study included the results of a Principal Components Analysis showing 3 factors for the Spiritual Transcendence Scale and one factor for Religiosity

 

Availability: Author contract:   rpiedmont@loyola.edu

Permissions -- if identified

 

Reference for the scale

Piedmont, R. L., Kennedy, M. C., Sherman, M. F., Sherman, N. C., & Williams, J. E. G. (2008). "A Psychometric Evaluation Of The Assessment Of Spirituality And Religious Sentiments (Aspires) Scale: Short Form". In Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 19. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill. doi: https://doi.org/10.1163/ej.9789004166462.i-299.55

 

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Resource Link:  A – Z Test Index

Understanding the Psychological Soul of Spirituality

   by Ralph Piedmont and Teresa Wilkins









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Wednesday, May 18, 2022

Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale AMAS

 



Scale name: Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale AMAS

Scale overview: The Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale (AMAS) is a 9-item measure of anxiety related to mathematics.

Authors: Hopko et al.

Response Type: The AMAS uses a 5-point Likert-type rating scale.

1 = Low anxiety

2 = Some anxiety

3 = Moderate anxiety

4 = Quite a bit of anxiety

5 = High anxiety

Sample items

Having to use the tables in the back of a math book.

Taking an examination in a math course.

Reliability: Internal consistent value (Cronbach’s Alpha) = .90 and 2-week test-retest = .85 (Hopko et al. 2003)

Validity: The Hopko et al. (2003) article reports strong convergent validity with other measures and the results of a factor analysis.

Availability:

Permissions -- if identified

Author email from the article below: dhorpko@utk.edu

 

Reference for the scale

Hopko, D. R., Mahadevan, R., Bare, R. L., & Hunt, M. K. (2003). The abbreviated math anxiety scale (AMAS) construction, validity, and reliability. Assessment, 10, 178-182. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1073191103010002008

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 Related measure

Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Anxiety Questionnaire   MSEAQ


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Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Anxiety Questionnaire (MSEAQ)

 


Scale name: Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Anxiety Questionnaire (MSEAQ)

Scale overview: The Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Anxiety Questionnaire (MSEAQ) is a 29-item self-report measure of both mathematics self-efficacy and mathematics anxiety.

Author: Diana Kathleen May

Response Type: Items are rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale following a “no response” option:

1 = Never

2 = Seldom

3 = Sometimes

4 = Often

5 = usually

Sample items

1. I feel confident enough to ask questions in my mathematics class.

6. I worry that I will not be able to get a good grade in my mathematics course.

 

Subscales and basic statistics for the MSEAQ

     Self-Efficacy M = 44.11, SD = 10.78, alpha = .93

     Anxiety M = 46.47, SD = 12.61, alpha = .93

     Total Scale M = 90.58, SD = 22.78, alpha = .96

Reliability: See the Cronbach’s alpha levels reported above.

Validity: There were significant positive correlations with similar measures. The results of a Factor Analysis are included in the dissertation.

 

Availability: The scale is in Appendix B of May’s dissertation at the University of Georgia.

https://esploro.libs.uga.edu/esploro/outputs/doctoral/Mathematics-Self-Efficacy-and-Anxiety-Questionnaire/9949333688402959

Permissions- Generally users should contact the author unless permission to use a measure has been stated. Many authors permit free use of measures for the purposes of research and education.

Sharing: Please share this post and blog to others interested in tests and statistics. Thank you.


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Reference for the scale

May. (2009). Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Anxiety Questionnaire [University of Georgia]. http://getd.libs.uga.edu/pdfs/may_diana_k_200908_phd.pdf

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These related scales may be of interest

Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale    AMAS

Academic Self-Efficacy for Students     ASESS

 Academic Self-Efficacy Scale      ASE

General Self-Efficacy Scale       GSE


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Wednesday, May 11, 2022

Vengeance Scale - Measuring Revenge

 


Scale name: Vengeance Scale

Scale overview: 

The Vengeance Scale is a 20-item self-report inventory with 10 items reversed scored.

Authors: Noreen Stuckless & Richard Goranson

Response Type: 7-point Likert type.

1 = Disagree strongly

2 = Disagree

3 = disagree slightly

4 = Neither disagree or agree

5 = Agree slightly

6 = Agree

7 = Agree strongly

Subscales: None

Sample items

It’s not worth my time or effort to pay back someone who has wronged me. (Reverse score)

It’s important for me to get back at people who have hurt me.

 

Psychometric properties: Study 1: The scale mean for the 20 items was 67.28. Men (71.84) scored significantly higher than did women (65.29).

Reliability: Study 1 and Study 2 alphas = .92. In study 3, a test-retest correlation = .90.

Validity: The structure was examined by Factor Analysis. The researchers concluded that a single factor was the best fit.

In study 2, Vengeance scores were negatively correlated with empathy and positively correlated with trait anger

Availability: See pages 41-42 of the article for the 20 items.

Permissions -- if identified

Read more about revenge, vengeance and retaliatory aggression.

Reference

Stuckless, N. & Goranson, R. (1992). The vengeance scale: Development of a measure of attitudes toward revenge, Journal of Social Behavior and Personality, 7, 25-42.

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Projective Testing

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